Saturday, 9 September 2017

Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost/Second Sunday in September

The responsories for the Benedictine Office for the Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost this year are those for the First and Second Sundays of September.  Details of where to find the chants for them, and recordings for several of them (note that some videos may not be playable in some regions) can be found here.

If you are using a breviary note that the Nocturn I&II readings are for September 2; Nocturn III for the Fourteenth Sunday.

Nocturn I

Reading 1: Lesson from the book of Job - And Job answered, and said: Indeed I know it is so, and that man cannot be justified compared with If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one for a thousand. He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength: who hath resisted him, and hath had peace Who hath removed mountains, and they whom he overthrew in his wrath, knew it not.

R. Si bona suscépimus de manu Dei, mala autem quare non sustineámus? * Dóminus dedit, Dóminus ábstulit; sicut Dómino plácuit, ita factum est: sit nomen Dómini benedíctum.
V. Nudus egréssus sum de útero matris meæ et nudus revértar illuc.
R. Dóminus dedit, Dóminus ábstulit; sicut Dómino plácuit, ita factum est: sit nomen Dómini benedíctum.
R. What shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil? * The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.

Reading 2: Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble. Who commandeth tile sun and it riseth not: and shutteth up the stars as it were under a seal:Who alone spreadeth out the heavens, and walketh upon the waves of the sea. Who maketh Arcturus, and Orion, and Hyades, and the inner parts of the south.

R. Antequam cómedam, suspiro, et tamquam inundántes aquæ sic rugitus meus; quia timor, quem timebam, evenit mihi, et quod verébar accidit. Nonne dissimulávi? nonne sílui? nonne quiévi? * Et venit super me indignátio.
V. Ecce non est auxílium mihi in me, et necessarii quoque mei recessérunt a me.
R. Et venit super me indignatio.
R. My sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters, for the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. Was not I silent? Held not I my peace? Was not I at rest? * And trouble came.
V. Behold, I cannot help myself, and they that were needful unto me have forsaken me.
R. And trouble came.

Reading 3: Who doth things great and incomprehensible, and wonderful, of which there is no number.  If he come to me, I shall not see him: if he depart I shall not understand. If he examine on a sudden, who shall answer him? or who can say: Why dost thou so? God, whose wrath no mall can resist, and under whom they stoop that bear up the world.

R. Quare detraxístis sermónibus veritátis? ad increpándum verba compónitis et subvertere nitímini amícum vestrum:  * Verúmtamen quæ cogitástis, expléte.
V. Quod justum est, judicáte; et non inveniétis in lingua mea iniquitátem.
R. Verúmtamen quæ cogitástis, expléte.
R. Why do ye argue against the words of truth? Do ye imagine words to reprove me and strive to confound one that is your friend? * Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.
V. Judge that which is just, and ye shall find no iniquity in my tongue.
R. Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.

Reading 4: What am I then, that I should answer him, and have words with him? I, who although I should have any just thing, would not answer, but would make supplication to my judge. And if he should hear me when I call, I should not believe that he had heard my voice.  For he shall crush me in a whirlwind, and multiply my wounds even without cause.

R. Versa est in luctum cíthara mea, et órganum meum in vocem fléntium: * Parce mihi, Dómine, nihil enim sunt dies mei.
V. Cutis mea denigráta est super me, et ossa mea aruérunt.
R. Parce mihi, Dómine, nihil enim sunt dies mei.
V: Gloria Patri...
R. Parce mihi, Dómine, nihil enim sunt dies mei.
R. My harp is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep. * Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V: Glory be...
R: R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.


Nocturn II

Reading 5: From the book of Morals of St Gregory, Pope - We know that it is so of a truth, and that a man cannot be justified as against God. When God is put out of the consideration, a man may be considered to be just, but considered as against God, his righteousness vanisheth away. When a man measureth himself by his relation to Him, Who is the Author of all good, he doth thereby acknowledge that of himself he hath no good in him, but hath received from God whatsoever he hath. He that glorifieth himself because of good which hath been given him, fighteth against God with God's own gifts. It is just therefore that the grounds upon which he ought to have been humbled, but upon which he hath puffed himself up, should be used to humble his vain-glory.

R. Induta est caro mea putredine, et sordibus pulveris cutis mea áruit et contracta est: * Memento mei, Dómine, quóniam ventus est vita mea.
V. Dies mei velocius transiérunt quam a texénte tela succiditur, et consumpti sunt absque ulla spe.
R. Memento mei, Dómine, quóniam ventus est vita mea.
R. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust. My skin is dry and drawn together.* Remember me, O Lord, for my life is wind.
V. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, and are spent without hope.
R. Remember me, Lord, for my life is wind.

Reading 6: But an holy man, because he perceiveth that the worth of our own good deeds falleth short, when he considereth his own spiritual man, justly saith If He will contend with him, he cannot answer Him one of a thousand.

R. Paucitas diérum meórum finiétur brevi; dimítte me, Dómine, ut plangam paululum dolórem meum, * Antequam vadam ad terram tenebrósam et opértam mortis calígine.
V. Manus tuæ, Dómine, fecérunt me, et plasmavérunt me totum in circúitu; et sic repénte præcípitas me?
R. Antequam vadam ad terram tenebrósam et opértam mortis calígine.
R. My days are few, and in a short while they will be ended. Let me alone, then, O Lord, that I may bewail my sorrow a little; * Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.
V. Thine hands, O Lord, have made me, and fashioned me together round about, and yet dost Thou forthwith destroy me.

Reading 7: In the Holy Scriptures the numeral a thousand is used to be taken as signifying a generalization. Thus, the Psalmist saith The word which He commanded to a thousand generations, whereas it is notorious that the Evangelist doth not reckon more then seventy-and-seven generations between the very beginning of the world and the coming of our Redeemer. What therefore is to be understood here by a thousand. The general ripeness of the old generation to bring forth a new offspring. Hence also it is said by John And shall reign with Him a thousand years, because the reign of the Holy Church will be over all mankind made perfect.

R. Non abscóndas me, Dómine, a fácie tua: manum tuam longe fac a me, * Et formído tua non me térreat.
V. Corripe me, Dómine, in misericórdia, non in furóre tuo, ne forte ad níhilum rédigas me.
R. Et formído tua non me térreat.
R. Hide not thy face from me, O Lord. Withdraw not thine hand far from me, * And let not thy dread make me afraid.
V. O Lord, correct me but in mercy not in thine anger, lest Thou bring me to nothing.
R. And let not thy dread make me afraid

Reading 8: When times one is ten, and ten times ten is an hundred, and ten times an hundred is a thousand. Observing therefore this connection between one and a thousand, what are we to understand by the one (in the text, connected as it is with the thousand whereby we understand perfection)? Is it not the beginning of a good life, even as the thousand representeth perfection? The contending with God (which is spoken of in the text) is the nonacknowledgment of that which is owed to Him, and the vain-glorying instead in our own strength. But an holy man should see, that even if one had received the gifts of perfection, and were to make them the grounds of self-glorifying, such an one would thereby lose all that he had received.

R. Utinam appenderéntur peccáta mea, quibus iram merui, * Et calámitas, quam patior, in statéra.
V. Quasi arena maris hæc gravior apparéret, unde et verba mea dolóre sunt plena.
R. Et calámitas, quam patior, in statéra.
V Gloria Patri..
R. Et calámitas, quam patior, in statéra.
R. O that my sins, whereby I have deserved wrath;* And the calamity whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. For now it would appear heavier than the sand of the sea, therefore also my words are full of sorrow.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V Glory be
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.

Nocturn III

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew - At that time, Jesus said unto His disciples: No man can serve two masters. And so on.

Homily by St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo - "No man can serve two masters," and this is further explained "for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other." These words we ought carefully to weigh, for the Lord showeth straightway who be the two masters whom we have choice of: "Ye cannot serve God and Mammon." 

R. Quis mihi tríbuat, ut in inférno prótegas me et abscóndas me, donec pertránseat furor tuus, Dómine, nisi tu, qui solus es Deus? * Et constituas mihi tempus, in quo recordéris mei?
V. Numquid sicut dies hóminis dies tui, ut quæras iniquitátem meam; cum sit nemo, qui de manu tua possit erúere.
R. Et constituas mihi tempus, in quo recordéris mei?
R. O that Thou wouldest hide me in the grave; that Thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, even thine, O Lord, Thou That alone art God; * That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!
V. Are thy days as the days of man, that Thou inquirest after mine iniquity, and there is none that can deliver out of thine hand.
R. That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!

Reading 10: Mammon is a term which the Hebrews are said to use for riches. It is also a Carthaginian word for the Punic for "gain" is "mammon." He which serveth mammon, serveth that evil one who hath perversely chosen to be lord of these earthly things, and is called by the Lord "the prince of this world." 

R: Numquid Deus supplantat judicium? aut Omnipotens subvertit quod justum est?Libera me, Domine, et pone me juxta te, * Et cujusvis manus pugnet contra me.
V: Apprehende arma et scutum, et exsurge in adjutorium mihi
R: Et cujusvis manus pugnet contra me.
R:  Doth God pervert judgment, or doth the Almighty overthrow that which is just? Deliver me, O Lord, and set me beside thee, * And let any man’s hand fight against me.
V:Take hold of arms and shield: and rise up to help me.
R: And let any man’s hand fight against me.

Reading 11: Of these two masters, either a man will hate the one and love the other, that is God or he will hold to the one and despise the other. He which serveth mammon holdeth to an hard and destroying master, for he is led captive by his lust, and sold a slave to the devil, and him loveth no man is there any man that loveth the devil And yet there be that hold to him.

R: Nocte os meum perforatur doloribus et qui me comedunt non dormiunt a multitudine eorum consumitur vestimentum meum comparatus sum luto * Et assimilatus sum favillae et cineri
V:  O custos hominum? quare posuisti me contrarium tibi, et factus sum mihimetipsi gravis? Parce mihi, nihil enim sunt dies mei.
R: Et assimilatus sum favillae et cineri
R: In the night my bone is pierced with sorrows: and they that feed upon me, do not sleep.With the multitude of them my garment is consumed, and they have girded me about, as with the collar of my coat. I am compared to dirt, * And am likened to embers and ashes.
V: O keeper of men? why hast thou set me opposite to thee, and I am become burdensome to myself? Spare me, for my days are nothing
R: And am likened to embers and ashes.

Reading 12: "Therefore, I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on lest, albeit such things are not idle, but needful to be sought after, yet the seeking for things even needful should divide the heart and our intention should be corrupted when we do something as it were mercifully that is, lest, when we would seem to be seeking another's good, it should be profit to ourselves, rather than benefit to him, that we seek and therefore we seem not to ourselves to sin, because we would seek things not idle, but needful.

R. Duo Seraphim clamabant alter ad alterum:
* Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: * Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
V. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant in caelo, Pater, Verbum, et Spiritus Sanctus: et hi tres unum sunt.
R. Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth:
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
R. One Seraph cried unto another* Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: St Matthew 6:24-33:

No man can serve two masters. For either he will hate the one, and love the other: or he will sustain the one, and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon. Therefore I say to you, be not solicitous for your life, what you shall eat, nor for your body, what you shall put on. Is not the life more than the meat: and the body more than the raiment?  Behold the birds of the air, for they neither sow, nor do they reap, nor gather into barns: and your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are not you of much more value than they? And which of you by taking thought, can add to his stature by one cubit?  And for raiment why are you solicitous? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin.  But I say to you, that not even Solomon in all his glory was arrayed as one of these.  And if the grass of the field, which is today, and tomorrow is cast into the oven, God doth so clothe: how much more you, O ye of little faith?  Be not solicitous therefore, saying, What shall we eat: or what shall we drink, or wherewith shall we be clothed?  For after all these things do the heathens seek. For your Father knoweth that you have need of all these things.  Seek ye therefore first the kingdom of God, and his justice, and all these things shall be added unto you.

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