Saturday, 17 June 2017

Second Sunday after Pentecost

The Matins readings for the Benedictine Office for the Second Sunday after Pentecost are set out below.

Nocturn I (I Kings/Samuel 1)

Reading 1:Lesson from the first book of Samuel  - There was a man once called Elcana, that lived at Ramathaim-Sophim, in the hill-country of Ephraim; he was an Ephraimite born, descended from Suph through Jeroham, Eliu and Thohu. He had two wives, one called Anna, the other Phenenna, and this Phenenna had borne him sons, whereas Anna was childless. Never a feast-day would he keep in his own city; he must be at Silo, worshipping the Lord of hosts, and offering him sacrifice; there dwelt the Lord’s priests, Ophni and Phinees, the two sons of Heli.

R. Praeparate corda vestra Domino, et servite illi soli:
* Et liberabit vos de manibus inimicorum vestrorum.
V. Convertimini ad eum in toto corde vestro, et auferte deos alienos de medio vestri. Et liberabit vos de manibus inimicorum vestrorum.
R. Prepare your hearts unto the Lord, and serve Him Only * And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.
V. Return unto Him with all your hearts, and put away the strange gods from among you.
R. And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.

Reading 2: When the time came for Elcana’s sacrifice, Phenenna must have many portions, for a son here, a daughter there, and he was sad at heart as he gave Anna her single portion, for Anna he loved dearly. Why had the Lord denied her motherhood? And still she must endure bitter persecution from her rival, that did not scruple to make her childlessness a matter of reproach; year after year, when they went up to the Lord’s temple for the feast, it was ever the same.

R. Deus omnium exauditor est: ipse misit Angelum suum et tulit me de ovibus patris mei:
* Et unxit me unctione misericordiae suae.
V. Dominus, qui eripuit me de ore leonis, et de manu bestiae liberavit me.
R. Et unxit me unctione misericordiae suae.
R. God, Which heareth all, even He sent His Angel, and took me from keeping my father's sheep, and * Anointed me with the oil of His mercy.
V. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear
R. And anointed me with the oil of His mercy.

Reading 3: In tears she sat, with no heart for eating, while her husband Elcana tried to comfort her. Anna, he said, what need to weep, what need to deny thyself food? What sorrow weighs on thy heart? Is it not worth the love of ten sons, the love I bear thee?

R. Dominus, qui eripuit me de ore leonis, et de manu bestiae liberavit me, * Ipse me eripiet de manibus inimicorum meorum.
V. Misit Deus misericordiam suam, et veritatem suam: animam meam eripuit de medio catulorum leonum.
R. Ipse me eripiet de manibus inimicorum meorum.
R. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear * He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.
V. God hath sent forth His mercy and His truth, and delivered my soul from among the lion's whelps.
R. He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.

Reading 4: Once, on such a visit to Silo, when eating and drinking was done, Anna rose up from her place and went to the temple door, where the priest Heli was sitting. Sad at heart, she prayed to the Lord with many tears, and made a vow: Lord of hosts, if thou wilt take good heed of this sorrow I bear, if thou wilt keep this handmaid of thine ever in remembrance, and grant her a son, then he shall be my gift to the Lord all his life long, a Nazirite unshorn.

R. Recordare, Dómine, testaménti tui, et dic Angelo percutiénti: Cesset jam manus tua, * Ut non desolétur terra, et ne perdas omnem ánimam vivam.
V. Ego sum qui peccávi, ego qui iníque egi: isti qui oves sunt, quid fecérunt? Avertátur, óbsecro, furor tuus, Dómine, a pópulo tuo.
R. Ut non desolétur terra, et ne perdas omnem ánimam vivam.
V: Gloria Patri
R: Ut non desolétur terra, et ne perdas omnem ánimam vivam.
R. Remember, O Lord, thy covenant, and say unto the destroying Angel: Stay now thine hand;
* That the land be not utterly laid waste, and that thou destroy not every living soul.
V. Even I it is that have sinned, and done evil indeed but these sheep what have they done? Let thine anger, I pray thee, O Lord, be turned away from thy people.
R. That the land be not utterly laid waste, and that Thou destroy not every living soul.
V: Glory be...
R. That the land be not utterly laid waste, and that Thou destroy not every living soul.

Nocturn II

Reading 5: Sermon of St John Chrysostom - His Word saith: "This is My Body." This we confess, and believe, and, with spiritual eyes, do see. Christ hath not left unto us Himself in such form as that we can see, hear, touch, smell, or taste Him and yet hath He left Himself unto us in things which we can see, hear, touch, smell, and taste, and which all men may understand. Thus also is it in baptism by mean of water, which men perceive outwardly, is given unto them a gift which they can grasp only inwardly, that is, a new birth. If we had no bodies, then would these things be given us without any outward and visible signs, but since we are here made up of souls and bodies, there are given unto our souls gifts which they can grasp, in outward signs which our bodies may perceive. How many there be which say I would that I could see His comely presence, His Face, His garments, even His shoes Behold, thou dost see and touch Him, yea, thou dost feed upon Him. And wouldest thou behold His raiment Lo, He hath given unto thee not only to behold it, but to feed upon it, and handle it, and take it into thyself.

R. Percussit Saul mille, et David decem millia:* Quia manus Domini erat cum illo: percussit Philisthaeum, et abstulit opprobrium ex Israël.
V. Nonne iste est David, de quo canebant in choro, dicentes: Saul percussit mille, et David decem millia?
R. Quia manus Domini erat cum illo: percussit Philisthaeum, et abstulit opprobrium ex Israël.
R. Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.* Because the hand of the Lord was with him, he smote the Philistine, and took away the reproach from Israel.
V. Is not this David? Did they not sing one to another of him in dances, saying Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands?
R. Because the hand of the Lord was with him, he smote the Philistine, and took away the reproach from Israel.

Reading 6: At this table of the Lord let none dare to draw near with squeamishness or carelessness. Let all be fiery, all hot, all roused. To the Jews it was commanded touching the Paschal lamb: "And thus shall ye eat it with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand and ye shall eat it in haste it is the Lord's Passover." But thou needest to be more watchful than they. They were just about to travel from Egypt to Palestine, and therefore they bore the guise of travellers but the journey that lieth before thee is from earth to heaven.

R. Montes Gelboe, nec ros nec pluvia veniant super vos, * Ubi ceciderunt fortes Israël.
V. Omnes montes, qui estis in circuitu ejus, visitet Dominus: a Gelboe autem transeat.
R. Ubi ceciderunt fortes Israël.
R. Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain upon you * For there are the mighty of Israel fallen
V. All ye mountains that stand round about, the Lord look upon you but let Him pass by Gilboa
R. For there are the mighty of Israel fallen

Reading 7: And therefore it behoveth thee in all things to be on thy guard, for the punishment of him that eateth or drinketh unworthily is no light one. Bethink thee how thou art indignant against him which betrayed, and them that crucified the Lord and look to it well that thou also be not " Guilty of the Body and Blood of the Lord." As for them, they slew His Most Holy Body but thou, after all that He hath done for thee, dost thrust Him into thy polluted soul. For His love, it was not enough to be made Man, to be buffeted, and to be crucified He hath also mingled Himself with us, by making us His Body, and that not by faith only, but verily and indeed.

R. Ego te tuli de domo patris tui, dicit Dominus, et posui te pascere gregem populi mei:
* Et fui tecum in omnibus ubicumque ambulasti, firmans regnum tuum in aeternum.
V. Fecique tibi nomen grande, juxta nomen magnorum, qui sunt in terra: et requiem dedi tibi ab omnibus inimicis tuis.
R. Et fui tecum in omnibus ubicumque ambulasti, firmans regnum tuum in aeternum.
R. Thus saith the Lord I took thee out of thy father's house, and appointed thee to be ruler over My people, over Israel. * And I was with thee whithersoever thou wentest, to establish thy kingdom for ever.
V. And I have made thee a great name, like unto the name of the great men that are in the earth and have caused thee to rest from all thine enemies.
R. And I was with thee whithersoever thou wentest, to establish thy kingdom for ever.

Reading 8: Anything be purer than that man ought to be, who eateth of this great Sacrifice Can sun-beam be clearer than that hand ought to be which breaketh this Flesh? that mouth, which is filled with that spiritual fire? that tongue, which is reddened by that Blood, awful exceedingly? That whereon the Angels quail to look, neither dare to gaze steadfastly upon It, because of the blinding glory that shineth therefrom, upon This we feed, with This we become one, and are made one body of Christ, and one flesh. "Who can utter the mighty acts of the Lord who can show forth all His praise?" Where is the shepherd which feedeth his flock with his own blood Nay, why should I say, shepherd Many mothers there be, who after all the pains of travail, give their own little ones to strangers to nurse. But so would not He, but feedeth us with His Own Blood, and maketh us to grow up in His Own substance.

R. Exaudísti, Dómine, oratiónem servi tui, ut ædificarem templum nómini tuo: * Bénedic et sanctifica domum istam in sempitérnum, Deus Israël.
V. Dómine, qui custodis pactum cum servis tuis, qui ámbulant coram te in toto corde suo.
R. Bénedic et sanctifica domum istam in sempitérnum, Deus Israël.
V: Gloria Patri
R. Bénedic et sanctifica domum istam in sempitérnum, Deus Israël.
R. O Lord, Thou hast hearkened unto the prayer of thy servant, that I might build a temple unto thy Name,* O God of Israel, bless Thou, and hallow this house for ever.
V. O Lord, Who keepest covenant with thy servants that walk before thee in all their heart.
R. O God of Israel, bless Thou, and hallow this house for ever.
V: Glory be...
R. O God of Israel, bless Thou, and hallow this house for ever.

Nocturn III (St Gregory, Homily on the Gospels no 1):

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Luke - At that time: Jesus spake unto the Pharisees this parable: A certain man made a great supper, and bade many. And so on.

Homily by Pope St. Gregory the Great - Dearly beloved brethren, between the dainties of the body and the dainties of the mind there is this difference, that the dainties of the body, when we lack them, raise up a great hunger after them, and when we devour them, straightway our fulness worketh in us niceness. But about the dainties of the mind we are nice while as yet we lack them, and when we fill ourselves with them, then are we an-hungered after them, and the more, being an-hungered, we feed thereon, the more are we an-hungered thereafter.

R. Peccávi super númerum arenæ maris, et multiplicáta sunt peccáta mea: et non sum dignus vidére altitúdinem cæli præ multitúdine iniquitátis meæ: quóniam irritávi iram tuam,
* Et malum coram te feci.
V. Quóniam iniquitátem meam ego cognósco: et delíctum meum contra me est semper, quia tibi soli peccávi.
R. Et malum coram te feci.
R. My sins are many, yea, they are more in number than the sands of the sea; I am not worthy to look up toward heaven because of the multitude of my iniquities; for I have provoked thee to anger * And done evil in thy sight.
V. For I acknowledge my transgression, and my sin is ever before me, for against thee only have I sinned
R. And done evil in thy sight.

Reading 10: In the bodily dainties, the hunger is keener than the fulness, but in the spiritual the fulness is keener than the hunger. In the bodily, hunger gendereth fulness, and fulness niceness in the spiritual, hunger indeed gendereth fulness, but fulness gendereth hunger. Scriptural dainties, in the very eating, do stir up the keenness of hunger in the mind which they fill, for, the more we taste their sweetness, the better we know how well they deserve to be loved and, if we taste them not, we cannot love them, for we know not how sweet they be.

R. Audi, Dómine, hymnum et oratiónem, quam servus tuus orat coram te hódie, ut sint óculi tui aperti, et aures tuæ intentæ,  * Super domum istam die ac nocte.
V. Réspice, Dómine, de sanctuario tuo, et de excélso cælórum habitáculo.
R. Super domum istam die ac nocte.
R. Hearken, O Lord, unto the cry and to the prayer which thy servant prayeth before thee today, that thine eyes may be open and thine ears attend; * Toward this house day and night.
V. Look down from thine high and holy place, O Lord, even from heaven thy dwelling.
R. Toward this house, day and night.

Reading 11: And who can love that whereof he knoweth nothing Hence saith the Psalmist " O taste and see that the Lord is good", that is, as it were, " If ye taste not, ye shall not see His goodness but let your heart once taste the bread of life, and then indeed, having tasted and proved His sweetness, ye shall be able to love Him." But these were the dainties which man lost when he sinned in Eden, and when he had shut his own mouth against the sweet bread whereof if any man eat he shall live for ever, he forsook paradise.

R. Dómine, si convérsus fúerit pópulus tuus, et oráverit ad sanctuárium tuum: * Tu exáudies de cælo, Dómine, et líbera eos de mánibus inimicórum suórum.
V. Si peccaverit in te pópulus tuus, et convérsus égerit pœniténtiam, veniensque oráverit in isto loco.
R. Tu exáudies de cælo, Dómine, et líbera eos de mánibus inimicórum suórum.
R. Lord, when thy people shall turn again to thee, and shall pray unto thee in this house
* then hear Thou in heaven, O Lord, and deliver them out of the hand of their enemies.
V. If thy people sin against thee, and turn again, and repent, and come and pray unto thee in this house.
R. Then hear Thou in heaven, O Lord, and deliver them out of the hand of their enemies.

Reading 12: And we that, from the first man, are born under the afflictions of this pilgrimage, are come into the world smitten with niceness we know not what we ought to want, and the disease of our niceness groweth the worse, as our soul draweth itself the more away from that bread of sweetness. We are no longer an-hungered after inward dainties, since we have lost the use of feeding on them. And so in our niceness we starve, and the sickness of long famishing maketh prey of our health. We will not eatof that inward sweetness which is made ready for us, and being enamoured only of things outward we sink into the wretchedness of loving starvation.

R. Duo Seraphim clamabant alter ad alterum:
* Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth: * Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
V. Tres sunt qui testimonium dant in caelo, Pater, Verbum, et Spiritus Sanctus: et hi tres unum sunt.
R. Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth:
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Plena est omnis terra gloria ejus.
R. One Seraph cried unto another* Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: St Luke 14:

 At ipse dixit ei: Homo quidam fecit cœnam magnam, et vocavit multos. Et misit servum suum hora cœnæ dicere invitatis ut venirent, quia jam parata sunt omnia.  Et cœperunt simul omnes excusare. Primus dixit ei: Villam emi, et necesse habeo exire, et videre illam: rogo te, habe me excusatum.  Et alter dixit: Juga boum emi quinque, et eo probare illa: rogo te, habe me excusatum.  Et alius dixit: Uxorem duxi, et ideo non possum venire.  Et reversus servus nuntiavit hæc domino suo. Tunc iratus paterfamilias, dixit servo suo: Exi cito in plateas et vicos civitatis: et pauperes, ac debiles, et cæcos, et claudos introduc huc.  Et ait servus: Domine, factum est ut imperasti, et adhuc locus est.  Et ait dominus servo: Exi in vias, et sæpes: et compelle intrare, ut impleatur domus mea.  Dico autem vobis quod nemo virorum illorum qui vocati sunt, gustabit cœnam meam.

But he said to him: A certain man made a great supper, and invited many. And he sent his servant at the hour of supper to say to them that were invited, that they should come, for now all things are ready. And they began all at once to make excuse. The first said to him: I have bought a farm, and I must needs go out and see it: I pray thee, hold me excused. And another said: I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to try them: I pray thee, hold me excused.  And another said: I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. And the servant returning, told these things to his lord. Then the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant: Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the feeble, and the blind, and the lame.  And the servant said: Lord, it is done as thou hast commanded, and yet there is room.  And the Lord said to the servant: Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled. But I say unto you, that none of those men that were invited, shall taste of my supper.

Friday, 16 June 2017

Our Lady on Saturday: Third Saturday of June

The reading in the Office of Our Lady for the third Saturday of June is from a sermon of St Augustine:

O beata Maria, quis tibi digne valeat jura gratiarum ac laudum praeconia rependere, quae singulari tuo assensu mundo succurristi perdito? Quas tibi laudes fragilitas humani generis persolvat, quae solo tuo commercio recuperandi aditum invenit? Accipe itaque quascumque exiles, quascumque meritis tuis impares gratiarum actiones: et cum susceperis vota, culpas nostras orando excusa. Admitte nostras preces intra sacrarium exauditionis et reporta nobis antidotum reconciliationis.
Blessed Mary, who is able enough to thank and to praise thee, thou, who by once saying Be it unto me, hast arisen to help a lost world? What blessings shall weak man utter upon thee, thou, who, by thine own one treaty, hast given unto him to find the entrance into new life? Receive these far and random, these unworthy thanksgivings, and, since thou receivest our prayers, by thy prayers obtain pardon for our sins. Let our supplications come into thine hallowed presence, and give us in return the medicine for our healing.

The responsory:

R. Felix namque es, sacra Virgo Maria, et omni laude dignissima: * Quia ex te ortus est sol justitiae, * Christus Deus noster.
V. Ora pro populo, interveni pro clero, intercede pro devoto femineo sexu: sentiant omnes tuum juvamen, quicumque celebrant tuam sanctam commemorationem.
R. Quia ex te ortus est sol justitiae.
V. Gloria Patri
R. Christus Deus noster.
R. O holy Virgin Mary, happy indeed art thou, and right worthy of all praise * For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness, even Christ our God.
V. Pray for the people, plead for the clergy, make intercession for all women vowed to God. Let all that are making this holy memorial of thee feel the might of thine assistance.
R. For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness
V. Glory be...
R. Even Christ our God.

Thursday, 15 June 2017

Reading and responsory for Fridays throughout the year

The one reading on Fridays in 'summer' at Matins is from Wisdom 1:6-7:

V: Jube Domne, benedicere
Pray Lord, a blessing
Blessing: A cunctis vitiis et peccatis absolvat nos virtus sanctæ Trinitatis.
From all vices and sins may the power of the Holy Trinity absolve us.
Reading: Benignus est enim spiritus sapientiæ, et non liberabit maledicum a labiis suis: quoniam renum illius testis est Deus, et cordis illius scrutator est verus, et linguæ ejus auditor * Quoniam spiritus Domini replevit orbem terrarum, et hoc quod continet omnia, scientiam habet vocis.
For the spirit of wisdom is benevolent, and will not acquit the evil speaker from his lips: for God is witness of his reins, and he is a true searcher of his heart, and a hearer of his tongue.For the Spirit of the Lord hath filled the whole world: and that, which containeth all things, hath knowledge of the voice.
V. Tu autem, Dómine, miserére nobis.
R. Deo grátias
But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
Thanks be to God.
Short responsory:
R: Misericordias Domini * in æternum cantabo
V: Misericordias Domini * in æternum cantabo
R: In generationem et progenie
V: In æternum cantabo
R: Gloria Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto
V: In æternum cantabo

The mercies of the Lord * I will sing for ever
The mercies of the Lord * I will sing for ever
From generation and generation
I will sing for ever
Glory be to the Father…
I will sing for ever

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Feast of Corpus Christi

The Matins readings in the Benedictine Office for the feast are set out below.

Nocturn I (1 Cor 11)

Reading 1: Lesson from the first letter of St. Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians - And when you assemble together, there is no opportunity to eat a supper of the Lord; each comer hastens to eat the supper he has brought for himself, so that one man goes hungry, while another has drunk deep. Have you no homes to eat and drink in, that you should shew contempt to God’s church, and shame the poor? Praise you? There is no room for praise here.

R. Immolabit haedum multitudo filiorum Israel ad vesperam Paschae: * Et edent carnes, et azymos panes.
V. Pascha nostrum immolatus est Christus: itaque epulemur in azymis sinceritatis et veritatis.
R. Et edent carnes, et azymos panes.
R. The whole assembly of the children of Israel shall kill the lamb toward the evening of the Passover. * And they shall eat the flesh, and unleavened bread.
V. Even Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us therefore let us keep the feast with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
R. And they shall eat the flesh, and unleavened bread.

Reading 2: The tradition which I received from the Lord, and handed on to you, is that the Lord Jesus, on the night when he was being betrayed, took bread, and gave thanks, and broke it, and said, Take, eat; this is my body, given up for you. Do this for a commemoration of me. And so with the cup, when supper was ended, This cup, he said, is the new testament, in my blood. Do this, whenever you drink it, for a commemoration of me.

R. Comedetis carnes, et saturabimini panibus: * Iste est panis, quem dedit vobis Dominus ad vescendum.
V. Non Moyses dedit vobis panem de caelo, sed Pater meus dat vobis panem de caelo verum.
R. Iste est panis, quem dedit vobis Dominus ad vescendum.
R. Ye shall eat flesh, and shall be filled with bread * This is the bread which the Lord hath given you to eat.
V. Moses gave you not that Bread from heaven, but My Father giveth you the true Bread from heaven.
R. This is the bread which the Lord hath given you to eat.

Reading 3: So it is the Lord’s death that you are heralding, whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, until he comes.  And therefore, if anyone eats this bread or drinks this cup of the Lord unworthily, he will be held to account for the Lord’s body and blood.

R. Respexit Elias ad caput suum subcinericium panem: qui surgens comedit et bibit: * Et ambulavit in fortitudine cibi illius usque ad montem Dei.
V. Si quis manducaverit ex hoc pane, vivet in aeternum.
R. Et ambulavit in fortitudine cibi illius usque ad montem Dei.
R. Elijah looked, and, behold, there was a cake baked on the coals at his head, and he arose, and did eat and drink * And went in the strength of that meat unto the mount of God.
V. If any man eat of this Bread, he shall live for ever.
R. And went in the strength of that meat unto the mount of God

Reading 4: A man must examine himself first, and then eat of that bread and drink of that cup; he is eating and drinking damnation to himself if he eats and drinks unworthily, not recognizing the Lord’s body for what it is. That is why many of your number want strength and health, and not a few have died. If we recognized our own fault, we should not incur these judgements;  as it is, the Lord judges us and chastises us, so that we may not incur, as this world incurs, damnation.

R: Panis quem ego dabo caro mea est pro mundi vita litigabant ergo Judaei dicentes * Quomodo potest hic nobis dare carnem suam ad manducandum?
V: Locutus est populus contra dominum anima nostra nauseat super cibo isto levissimo
R: Quomodo potest hic nobis dare carnem suam ad manducandum?
V: Gloria Patri..
R: Quomodo potest hic nobis dare carnem suam ad manducandum?
R:  And the bread that I will give, is my flesh, for the life of the world. The Jews therefore disputed, saying: * How can this man give us his flesh to eat?
V: The people spoke against the Lord saying   our soul now loathes this unsatisfying food.
R: How can this man give us his flesh to eat?
V; Glory be...
R: How can this man give us his flesh to eat?


Nocturn II (Sermon of St Thomas Aquinas)

Reading 5: From the Sermons of St. Thomas Aquinas - The immeasurable benefits, which the goodness of God hath bestowed on Christian people, have conferred on them also a dignity beyond all price. " For what nation is there so great, who hath gods so nigh unto them, as the Lord, our God, is" unto us?  The Only-begotten Son of God, being pleased to make us " partakers of the Divine nature," took our nature upon Him, being Himself made Man that He might make men gods. And all, as much of ours as He took, He applied to our salvation. On the Altar of the Cross He offered up His Body to God the Father as a sacrifice for our reconciliation He shed His Blood as the price whereby He redeemeth us from wretchedness and bondage, and the washing whereby He cleanseth us from all sin. And for a noble and abiding memorial of that so great work of His goodness, He hath left unto His faithful ones the Same His very Body for Meat, and the Same His very Blood for Drink, to be fed upon under the appearance of bread and wine.

R. Coenantibus illis accepit Jesus panem, et benedixit, ac fregit, deditque discipulis suis, et ait: * Accipite, et comedite: hoc est corpus meum.
V. Dixerunt viri tabernaculi mei: Quis det de carnibus ejus, ut saturemur?
R. Accipite, et comedite: hoc est corpus meum.
R. As they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blest it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said * Take, eat this is My Body.
V. The men of my tabernacle said O that we had of his flesh we cannot be satisfied.
R. Take, eat this is My Body.

Reading 6: How precious a thing then, how marvellous, how health-giving, how furnished with all dainties, is the Supper [of the Lord !] Than His Supper can anything be more precious ? Therein there is put before us for meat, not, as of old time, the flesh of bulls and of goats, but Christ Himself, our very God. Than this Sacrament can anything be more marvellous ? Therein it cometh to pass that bread and wine are bread and wine no more, but in the stead thereof there is the Body and there is the Blood of Christ; that is to say, Christ Himself, Perfect God and Perfect Man, Christ Himself is there, under the appearance of a little bread and wine.

R. Accepit Jesus calicem, postquam coenavit, dicens: Hic calix novum testamentum est in meo sanguine: * Hoc facite in meam commemorationem.
V. Memoria memor ero, et tabescet in me anima mea.
R. Hoc facite in meam commemorationem.
R. Jesus took the cup, after supper, saying This cup is the New Testament in My Blood. * This do in remembrance of Me.
V. My soul hath them still in remembrance, and is humbled in me.
R. This do in remembrance of Me.

Reading 7: His faithful ones eat Him, but He is not mangled ; nay, when [the veil which shroudeth Him in] this Sacrament is broken, in each broken piece thereof remaineth whole Christ Himself, Perfect God and Perfect Man. All that the senses can reach in this Sacrament, [look, taste, feel, smell, and the like, all these] abide of bread and wine, but the Thing is not bread and wine. And thus room is left for faith ; Christ Who hath a Form That can be seen, is here taken and received not only unseen, but seeming to be bread and wine, and the senses, which judge by the wonted look, are warranted against error.

R. Ego sum panis vitae: patres vestri manducaverunt manna in deserto, et mortui sunt:
* Hic est panis de caelo descendens, ut si quis ex ipso manducet, non moriatur.
V. Ego sum panis vivus, qui de caelo descendi: si quis manducaverit ex hoc pane, vivet in aeternum.
R. Hic est panis de caelo descendens, ut si quis ex ipso manducet, non moriatur.
R. I am that Bread of life. Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead.
* This is the Bread Which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.
V. I am the living Bread Which came down from heaven if any man eat of this Bread, he shall live for ever.
R. This is the Bread Which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.

Reading 8: Than this Sacrament can anything be more health - giving Thereby are sins purged away, strength renewed, and the soul fed upon the fatness of spiritual gifts. This Supper is offered up in the Church both for the quick and dead it was ordained to the health of all, all get the good of it. Than this Sacrament can anything be more furnished with dainties The glorious sweetness thereof is of a truth such that no man can fully tell it. Therein ghostly comfort is sucked from its very well - head. Therein a memorial is made of that exceeding great love which Christ showed in time of His sufferings. It was in order that the boundless goodness of that His great love might be driven home into the hearts of His faithful ones, that when He had celebrated the Passover with His disciples, and the last Supper was ended, the Lord " Jesus, knowing that His hour was come that He should depart out of this world unto the Father, having loved His own which were in the world, He loved them unto the end,"  and instituted this Sacrament, this Sacrament, the everlasting forth - " showing of His death until He come " again, this Sacrament, the embodied fulfilment of all the ancient types and figures, this Sacrament, the greatest miracle which He ever wrought, and the one mighty joy of them that now have sorrow, till He shall come again, and their heart shall rejoice, and their joy no man take from them.

R: Unus panis et unum corpus multi sumus * Omnes qui de uno pane et de uno calice participamus
V: Parasti in dulcedine tua pauperi deus qui habitare facis unanimes in domo
R Omnes qui de uno pane et de uno calice participamus
V: Gloria Patri..
R Omnes qui de uno pane et de uno calice participamus
R: Being many, we are one bread, one body, * All who partake of the one bread and of the one chalice.
V: In thy sweetness Thou hast provided for the poor, O God, who you make of one mind dwelling together in the house
R: All that partake of one bread and of the one chalice.
V Glory be
R All that partake of one bread and of the one chalice.

Nocturn III (from St Augustine)

Reading 9: By use of meat and drink men would fain that " they shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more," and yet there is but one Meat and one Drink, Which doth work in them that feed thereon that " this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal put on immortality,"  namely communion with that general assembly and Church of God's holy children, who are "kept in perfect peace," and are "all one," fully and utterly. And therefore it is, as men of God before our time have taken it, that our Lord Jesus Christ hath set before us His Body and His Blood in the likeness of things which, from being many, are reduced into one. In one loaf are many grains of corn, and one cup of wine the juice of many grapes.

R. Qui manducat meam carnem, et bibit meum sanguinem,* In me manet, et ego in eo.
V. Non est alia natio tam grandis, quae habeat deos appropinquantes sibi, sicut Deus noster adest nobis.
R. In me manet, et ego in eo.
R. He that eateth My Flesh and drinketh My Blood, * Dwelleth in Me, and I in him.
V. What nation is there so great, who hath gods so nigh unto them, as the Lord our God is to us
R. Dwelleth in Me, and I in him.

Reading 10: And now He giveth us to know how that which He spake cometh to pass, and how indeed "this Man can give us His Flesh to eat," and His Blood to drink. "He that eateth My Flesh, and drinketh My Blood, dwelleth in Me, and I in him." To dwell in Christ, therefore, and to have Him dwelling in us, is to "eat of that Bread and drink of that Cup."

R. Misit me vivens Pater, et ego vivo propter Patrem:
* Et qui manducat me, vivet propter me.
V. Cibavit illum Dominus pane vitae et intellectus.
R. Et qui manducat me, vivet propter me.
R. As the living Father hath sent Me, and I live by the Father, * So he that eateth Me, even he shall live by Me.
V. With the bread of life and understanding hath the Lord fed him.
R. So he that eateth Me, even he shall live by Me.

Reading 11: And he which dwelleth not in Christ, and in whom Christ dwelleth not, without all doubt doth not spiritually eat His Flesh nor drink His Blood, although he do carnally and visibly press the Sacrament with his teeth but, contrariwise, he "eateth and drinketh damnation to himself," because he dareth to draw nigh filthy to that secret and holy thing of Christ, whereunto none draweth nigh worthily, save he which is pure, even he which is of them concerning whom it is said "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.

R: Calix benedictionis, cui benedicimus, nonne communicatio sanguinis Christi est? * Et panis, quem frangimus, nonne participatio corporis Christi est? 
V:  Calix tuus inebrians, quam præclarus est, O Domine!
R: Et panis, quem frangimus, nonne participatio corporis Christi est? 
R: The chalice of benediction, which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? *And the bread, which we break, is it not the partaking of the body of the Lord?
V: Your chalice which inebriateth me, how goodly is it!
R: And the bread, which we break, is it not the partaking of the body of the Lord?

Reading 12: "As the living Father hath sent Me, and I live by the Father, so he that eateth Me, even he shall live by Me." This is as though He said: The Father hath sent Me into the world and I have emptied Myself [and taken upon Me the form of a servant, and being found in fashion as a man]. I have My life from the Father, as One That is greater than I. He that eateth Me, even he, by thereby taking part in Me, shall live by Me. It is as having humbled Myself that I live by the Father, but he that eateth Me, him will I raise up, and so he shall live by Me. It is said "I live by the Father" that is to say, He is of the Father, not the Father of Him, and yet not so, but that the Father and the Son are co-equal together. Also it is said "So he that eateth Me, even he shall live by Me," whereby He showeth the gracious work towards His people of Him Who is the "one Mediator between God and man," and not that He Which is eaten and he which eateth Him are co-equal together.

R: Transiturus de mundo ad Patrem Iesus, in mortis suae memoriam * Instituit sui corporis et sanguinis Sacramentum
V: Corpus in cibum sanguinem in potum tribuens: Hoc, ait, facite in meam commemorationem.
R: Instituit sui corporis et sanguinis Sacramentum
V: Gloria Patri
R: Instituit sui corporis et sanguinis Sacramentum
R: As Jesus was about to pass on from this world to the father, in memory of his death * He instituted the sacrament of his body and blood
V: Giving his body as food and his blood as drink: this, he affirms, do in remembrance of me
R: He instituted the sacrament of his body and blood
V: Glory be..
R: He instituted the sacrament of his body and blood

Gospel: St John 6:

For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed.  He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, abideth in me, and I in him. As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father; so he that eateth me, the same also shall live by me.  This is the bread that came down from heaven. Not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead. He that eateth this bread, shall live for ever.

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Feast of St Basil

The one reading for the fest of St Basil in the Benedictine Office is as follows:

Basil, a Cappodocian nobleman, studied profane letters at Athens together with his close friend, Gregory of Nazianzus, and took his sacred studies in a monastery. Becoming marvelously proficient in both, he soon attained such excellence in learning and in his way of life that from then on he was given the name of The Great. Summoned to preach the Gospel of Christ Jesus in Pontus, he called that province back to the way of salvation. Soon he was asked by Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, to aid him in teaching; and he succeeded Eusebius as bishop. Basil was among the first to defend the consubstantiality of the Son with the Father; and by his miracles he caused Emperor Valens, who was angry with him and threatening him with exile, to give up any such intentions. Basil's abstinence and continence were marvelled at; and he was constant in prayer, often spending the whole night in it. He built monasteries, ordering the monastic life so that it would best combine the advantages of the solitary life with those of the active life. He wrote many learned books; and, as Gregory of Nazianzus testifieth, no one hath explained the books of Holy Scripture more truly and fruitfully. He died on the 1st day of January.



R. In medio Ecclesiae aperuit os ejus * Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
V. Jucunditatem et exsultationem thesaurizavit super eum.
R. Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
V. Glória Patri, et Fílio, * et Spirítui Sancto.
R. Et implevit eum Dominus spiritu sapientiae et intellectus.
R. In the midst of the congregation did the Lord open his mouth. * And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.
V. He made him rich with joy and gladness.
R. And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. And filled him with the spirit of wisdom and understanding.

Monday, 12 June 2017

Matins reading for Tuesdays throughout the year


The one reading for days throughout the year in summer in the Benedictine Office on Tuesday is Proverbs 3:19-20:

Dominus sapientia fundavit terram; stabilivit cælos prudentia. Sapientia illius eruperunt abyssi, et nubes rore concrescunt.
The Lord by wisdom hath founded the earth, hath established the heavens by prudence. By his wisdom the depths have broken out, and the clouds grow thick with dew.

 The short responsory is as follows:

R: Deus, in nomine tuo * Salvum me fac
V: Et in misericordia tua libera me.
R: Salvum me fac
V: Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto
R: Deus, in nomine tuo * Salvum me fac
R: O God, by thy name * Save me
V: deliver me in thy justice.
R: Save me
V Glory be to the father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost
R: O God, by thy name * Save me

Readings for the Votive Office of St Benedict in June

The three readings for the traditional votive Office of St Benedict on Tuesday in June are as follows:


Reading 1: From chapter 2 of the first letter of St Paul to the Corinthians -  As it is written: That eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of man, what things God hath prepared for them that love him.  But to us God hath revealed them, by his Spirit. For the Spirit searcheth all things, yea, the deep things of God. For what man knoweth the things of a man, but the spirit of a man that is in him? So the things also that are of God no man knoweth, but the Spirit of God. Now we have received not the spirit of this world, but the Spirit that is of God; that we may know the things that are given us from God. Which things also we speak, not in the learned words of human wisdom; but in the doctrine of the Spirit, comparing spiritual things with spiritual.  But the sensual man perceiveth not these things that are of the Spirit of God; for it is foolishness to him, and he cannot understand, because it is spiritually examined.  But the spiritual man judgeth all things; and he himself is judged of no man.  For who hath known the mind of the Lord, that he may instruct him? But we have the mind of Christ.



R: Sanctus Benedictus plus appetiit mala mundi  perpeti quam laudes pro Deo laboribus fatigari * Quam vitae hujus favoribus extolli
V: Divina namque praeventus gratia magis ac magis ad superna animo suspirabat
R: Quam vitae hujus favoribus extolli
R St Benedict desiring rather the miseries of the world than the praises of men: rather to be wearied with labor for God's sake * than to be exalted with transitory commendation
V: For filled greatly with divine grace, his soul aspired to even higher things
R: Than to be exalted with transitory commendation 

Reading 2: From Book II of St Gregory's Dialogues, chapter 16  - At the same time a certain clergyman, that served in the church of Aquinum, was possessed: whom the venerable man Constantius, Bishop of the same city, sent to many places of holy martyrs for help: but God's holy martyrs would not deliver him, to the end that the world might know what great grace was in the servant of God, Benedict: wherefore at length he was brought to him, who, praying for help to Jesus Christ our Lord, forthwith cast the old enemy out of the possessed man's body, giving him this charge: "Go your way, and hereafter abstain from eating of flesh, and presume not to enter into holy orders, for whenever you shall attempt any such thing, the devil again will have power over you." The man departed safe and sound, and because punishment fresh in memory used to terrify the mind, he observed for a time what the man of God had given him in commandment. But after many years, when all his seniors were dead, and he saw his juniors preferred before him to holy orders, he neglected the words of the man of God, as though forgotten through length of time, and took on him holy orders: whereupon immediately the devil that before had left him entered again, and never ceased to torment him, until he had separated his soul from his body.

R: O laudanda sancti Benedicti merita gloriosa qui dum pro Christo patriam mundique sprevit pompam adeptus omnium contubernium beatorum * Et particeps factus praemiorum aeternorum
V: Inter choros confessorum splendidum possidet locum ubi ipsum fontem omnium intuetur bonorum
R: Et particeps factus praemiorum aeternorum
O praise the glorious merits of St Benedict who for Christ left his fatherland and the pomp of the world, and arrived at the companionship of all the blessed * And was made a partaker of eternal rewards
 V: He holds a splendid place among the chorus of confessors, where he gazes upon the font of all good
R: And was made a partaker of eternal rewards


Reading 3: [Peter] This holy man, as I perceive, knew the secret counsel of God: for he saw that this clergyman was delivered to the power of the devil, to the end he should not presume to enter into holy orders. [GREGORY]: Why should he not know the secrets of God, who kept the commandments of God: when as the scripture says: "He that cleaves to our Lord, is one spirit with him?" [PETER:] If he that cleaves to our Lord, be one spirit with our Lord, what is the meaning of that which the Apostle says: "Who knows the sense of our Lord, or who hath been his counselor?" for it seems very inconvenient to be ignorant of his sense, to whom being so united he is made one thing. [GREGORY:] Holy men, in that they be one with our Lord are not ignorant of his sense: for the same Apostle says: "For what man knows those things which belong to man, but the spirit of man which is in him? Even so, the things which belong to God, no man knows, but the spirit of God." And to show also that he knew such things as belong to God, he added straight after: "But we have not received the spirit of this world, but the spirit which is of God." And for this cause, again he says: "that eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, nor it hath ascended into the heart of man, those things which God hath prepared for them that love him, but God hath revealed to us by his spirit."

R: Sanctissime confessor Christi Benedicte monachorum pater et dux *  Intercede pro nostra omniumque salute
V: Devotae plebi subveni sancta intercessione ut tuis adjuta precibus regna caelestia consequatur
R: Intercede pro nostra omniumque salute
V: Gloria Patri...
R: Intercede...
R: O Benedict, Most holy confessor of Christ, father and leader of monks, * Intercede for us and the salvation of all
V: Assist your devoted people with holy intercession so that with the help of your prayers they may reach the heavenly kingdom
R: Intercede for us and the salvation of all
V: Glory be...
R: Intercede...

Sunday, 11 June 2017

Reading for Mondays throughout the year

Now that Eastertide and Pentecost are over, the Benedictine Office  has one short reading on ordinary days of the week, which is the same each day.

Benedictine Office short readings

Accordingly, I thought I would provide those to you, with their short responsories, for reference purposes, since Divinum Officium does not actually provide them.

For Monday, the reading comes from Lamentations 2:19:
Consurge, lauda in nocte, in principio vigiliarum; effunde sicut aquam cor tuum ante conspectum Domini: leva ad eum manus tuas 
Arise, give praise in the night, in the beginning of the watches: pour out thy heart like water before the face of the Lord: lift up thy hands to him
The responsory is:



R: Benedicam Dominum * in omni tempore
V: Benedicam Dominum * in omni tempore
R: Semper laus ejus in ore meo
V: In omni tempore
R: Gloria patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto
V: Benedicam Dominum * in omni tempore
R: I will bless the Lord * at all times
V: I will bless the Lord * at all times
R: His praise shall be always in my mouth.
V: At all times
R Glory be to the Father, and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost
R: I will bless the Lord * at all times