Saturday, 10 September 2016

Matins readings for the second Sunday of September



Nocturn I: Job 9:1-17

Reading 1: And Job answered, and said: Indeed I know it is so, and that man cannot be justified compared with If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one for a thousand. He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength: who hath resisted him, and hath had peace Who hath removed mountains, and they whom he overthrew in his wrath, knew it not.

R. What shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?
* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.

Reading 2: Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble. Who commandeth tile sun and it riseth not: and shutteth up the stars as it were under a seal:Who alone spreadeth out the heavens, and walketh upon the waves of the sea. Who maketh Arcturus, and Orion, and Hyades, and the inner parts of the south.

R. My sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters, for the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. Was not I silent Held not I my peace Was not I at rest* And trouble came.
V. Behold, I cannot help myself, and they that were needful unto me have forsaken me.
R. And trouble came.

Reading 3: Who doth things great and incomprehensible, and wonderful, of which there is no number.  If he come to me, I shall not see him: if he depart I shall not understand. If he examine on a sudden, who shall answer him? or who can say: Why dost thou so? God, whose wrath no mall can resist, and under whom they stoop that bear up the world.

R. Why do ye argue against the words of truth? Do ye imagine words to reprove me and strive to confound one that is your friend* Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.
V. Judge that which is just, and ye shall find no iniquity in my tongue.
R. Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.

Reading 4: What am I then, that I should answer him, and have words with him? I, who although I should have any just thing, would not answer, but would make supplication to my judge. And if he should hear me when I call, I should not believe that he had heard my voice.  For he shall crush me in a whirlwind, and multiply my wounds even without cause.

R. My harp is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.* Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.

Nocturn II: St Gregory, Book of Morals

Reading 5: We know that it is so of a truth, and that a man cannot be justified as against God. When God is put out of the consideration, a man may be considered to be just, but considered as against God, his righteousness vanisheth away. When a man measureth himself by his relation to Him, Who is the Author of all good, he doth thereby acknowledge that of himself he hath no good in him, but hath received from God whatsoever he hath. He that glorifieth himself because of good which hath been given him, fighteth against God with God's own gifts. It is just therefore that the grounds upon which he ought to have been humbled, but upon which he hath puffed himself up, should be used to humble his vain-glory.

R. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust. My skin is dry and drawn together.
* Remember me, O Lord, for my life is wind.
V. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, and are spent without hope.
R. Remember me, Lord, for my life is wind.

Reading 6: But an holy man, because he perceiveth that the worth of our own good deeds falleth short, when he considereth his own spiritual man, justly saith If He will contend with him, he cannot answer Him one of a thousand.

R. My days are few, and in a short while they will be ended. Let me alone, then, O Lord that I may bewail my sorrow a little
* Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.
V. thine hands, O Lord have made me, and fashioned me together round about, and yet dost Thou forthwith destroy me
R. Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.

Reading 7: In the Holy Scriptures the numeral a thousand is used to be taken as signifying a generalization. Thus, the Psalmist saith The word which He commanded to a thousand generations, whereas it is notorious that the Evangelist doth not reckon more then seventy-and-seven generations between the very beginning of the world and the coming of our Redeemer. What therefore is to be understood here by a thousand. The general ripeness of the old generation to bring forth a new offspring. Hence also it is said by John And shall reign with Him a thousand years, because the reign of the Holy Church will be over all mankind made perfect.

R. Hide not thy face from me, O Lord Withdraw not thine hand far from me
* And let not thy dread make me afraid.
V. O Lord, correct me but in mercy not in thine anger, lest Thou bring me to nothing.
R. And let not thy dread make me afraid.

Reading 8: When times one is ten, and ten times ten is an hundred, and ten times an hundred is a thousand. Observing therefore this connection between one and a thousand, what are we to understand by the one (in the text, connected as it is with the thousand whereby we understand perfection)? Is it not the beginning of a good life, even as the thousand representeth perfection? The contending with God (which is spoken of in the text) is the nonacknowledgment of that which is owed to Him, and the vain-glorying instead in our own strength. But an holy man should see, that even if one had received the gifts of perfection, and were to make them the grounds of self-glorifying, such an one would thereby lose all that he had received.

R. O that my sins, whereby I have deserved wrath* And the calamity whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. For now it would appear heavier than the sand of the sea, therefore also my words are full of sorrow.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.

Matins readings for the Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost (Nocturn III and Gospel)



Nocturn III (Sermon 72 of St John Chrysostom on Matthew)

Reading 9: At that time, the Pharisees came unto Jesus, and one of them, which was a lawyer, asked Him a question, tempting Him, saying: Master, which is the great commandment in the Law? And so on.

When the Pharisees had heard that Christ had put the Sadducees to silence, they gathered themselves together for a fresh attack just when it behoved them to be quiet, they willed to contend and so they put forward one of themselves who professed skill in the law, not wishing to learn, but to lay a snare. This person therefore proposed the question: "Which is the great commandment in the law?” The first and great commandment is: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God," but they expected that He would make some exception or addition to this in His Own case, since He made Himself God.  With this expectation they asked Him the question.

R. O that Thou wouldest hide me in the grave; that Thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, even thine, O Lord, Thou That alone art God;
* That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!
V. Are thy days as the days of man, that Thou inquirest after mine iniquity, and there is none that can deliver out of thine hand.
R. That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!

Reading 10: But what said Christ? To show that they had adopted this course, because they were loveless, and sick with envy, He answered: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it: "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself."

Responsory (cantus database)

Reading 11: Why is this second commandment like unto the first Because the first is the second's source and sanction. "For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light." John iii. 20. And again: "The fool hath said in his heart There is no God" and there followeth: "They are corrupt, and become abominable in their works."  And yet again: "The love of money is the root of all evil which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith." And yet once more: "If ye love Me, keep My commandments,", of which commandments the head and root is "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God and thy neighbour as thyself."

Responsory

Reading 12: If therefore, to love God is to love our neighbour also, as it appeared, where it is written: "Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou Me? And he said unto Him: 'Lord, Thou knowest all things, Thou knowest that I love thee.' Jesus saith unto him: 'Feed My sheep',", and if "love is the fulfilling of the law,", justly doth the Lord say that "on these two commandments hang all the law and the Prophets." And even as when, before this, being interrogated about the Resurrection, He answered them more than they asked, so, now, being interrogated concerning the first and great commandment, He answereth them, of His own accord, touching that second one also, which is little lower than the first, for "the second is like unto it." Herein He would have them understand that it was hatred stirred them up to question Him. For "Charity," saith the Apostle, "envieth not."

R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: Matt 22:34-46

But the Pharisees hearing that he had silenced the Sadducees, came together.  And one of them, a doctor of the law, asking him, tempting him: Master, which is the greatest commandment in the law?

Jesus said to him: Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment. And the second is like to this: Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments dependeth the whole law and the prophets.

And the Pharisees being gathered together, Jesus asked them, Saying: What think you of Christ? whose son is he?

They say to him: David's.

He saith to them: How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying: The Lord said to my Lord, Sit on my right hand, until I make thy enemies thy footstool? If David then call him Lord, how is he his son?

And no man was able to answer him a word; neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.

Thursday, 8 September 2016

Nativity of the BVM, Class II



Nocturn I: Song of Songs 1:1-16

Reading 1: Let him kiss me with the kiss of his mouth: for thy breasts are better than wine,
Smelling sweet of the best ointments. thy name is as oil poured out: therefore young maidens have loved thee. Draw me: we will run after thee to the odour of thy ointments. The king hath brought me into his storerooms: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, remembering thy breasts more than wine: the righteous love thee.

R. This day was the Blessed Virgin Mary born of the lineage of David.
* The same is she through whom the salvation of the world hath been manifested before the eyes of all believers. This is she whose glorious life hath given light to the world.
V. Let us keep with rejoicing the Birth-day of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. The same is she through whom the salvation of the world hath been manifested before the eyes of all believers. This is she whose glorious life hath given light to the world.

Reading 2: I am black but beautiful, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Cedar, as the curtains of Solomon. Do not consider me that I am brown, because the sun hath altered my colour: the sons of my mother have fought against me, they have made me the keeper in the vineyards: my vineyard I have not kept. Show me, O thou whom my soul loveth, where thou feedest, where thou liest in the midday, lest I begin to wander after the flocks of thy companions.

R. Let us keep right heartily the Birthday of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary,
* That she may pray for us to our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. Let us keep with right hearty rejoicing the Birthday of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. That she may pray for us to our Lord Jesus Christ.

Reading 3: If thou know not thyself, O fairest among women, go forth, and follow after the steps of the flocks, and feed thy kids beside the tents of the shepherds.To my company of horsemen, in Pharao's chariots, have I likened thee, O my love.Thy cheeks are beautiful as the turtledove's, thy neck as jewels.We will make thee chains of gold, inlaid with silver.

R. Let us tell again of the right worthy Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
* The same is she whose lowliness the Lord regarded, she who by the message of an Angel conceived the Saviour of the world.
V. Let us keep right earnestly the Birth-day of the most Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. The same is she whose lowliness the Lord regarded, she who by the message of an Angel conceived the Saviour of the world.

Reading 4: While the king was at his repose, my spikenard sent forth the odour thereof. A bundle of myrrh is my beloved to me, he shall abide between my breasts. A cluster of cypress my love is to me, in the vineyards of Engaddi. Behold thou art fair, O my love, behold thou art fair, thy eyes are as those of doves. Behold thou art fair, my beloved, and comely. Our bed is flourishing. The beams of our houses are of cedar, our rafters of cypress trees.

Nocturn II: Sermon of St Bernard (On the praises of the Virgin Mary 2:II, 17)

Not available online

Nocturn III: Sermon of St Jerome

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew,  The Book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the Son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham begat Isaac, and Isaac begat Jacob. And so on.

In Isaiah we read: "Who shall declare His generation?" Let us not think that there is any contradiction between the Prophet and the Evangelist, because the Prophet saith that this thing cannot be done, and the Evangelist beginneth by doing it. The one speaketh of the generation of the Divine (Word by the Eternal Father,) the other of the (family in which the) Incarnation (took place.) Matthew beginneth with carnal things, that by learning of men we may go on to learn of God. pedigree properly.

R. All generations shall call me blessed,
* For the Lord that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.
V. And his mercy is on them that fear him throughout all generations.
R. For the Lord that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.

Reading 10: "The Son of David, the son of Abraham." The reversal of the order in these clauses is a needful change. If Abraham had been put first and David afterwards, Abraham would have had to be taken again, in order to marshal the the pedigree properly.

R. Blessed are thou, O holy Virgin Mary, and most worthy of all praise,
* For out of thee arose the Sun of Righteousness, even Christ our God.
V. Pray for the people, plead for the clergy, entreat for all women dedicated to God: let everyone that keepeth holy-day in honour of thy Birthday know the benefit of thine intercession.
R. For out of thee arose the Sun of Righteousness.

Reading 11: Matthew first calleth Christ the Son of these twain Abraham and David without making mention of the others, because unto these twain only was promise of Christ made unto Abraham, where it is said: "In thy seed" that is, in Christ "shall all the nations of the earth be blessed,"  and unto David, in the words "Of the fruit of thy body will I set upon thy throne."

Reading 12: "And Judas begat Phares and Zara of Thamar." It is to be remarked that in the genealogy of the Saviour none of the holy women are named, but those women only are named against whom the Scripture hath to say something amiss. He Who came to save sinners was born of sinners, that He might wash away all sin. Afterwards are named Ruth, who was a Moabitess, and Bathsheba, who had been the wife of Uriah.

Gospel: St Matthew 1:1-16

A record of the ancestry from which Jesus Christ, the son of David, son of Abraham, was born. Abraham was the father of Isaac, Isaac of Jacob, Jacob of Juda and his brethren; Juda of Phares and Zara, by Thamar; Phares of Esron, Esron of Aram, Aram of Aminadab, Aminadab of Naasson, Naasson of Salmon; Salmon of Booz, by Rahab; Booz of Obed, by Ruth; Obed of Jesse; and Jesse was the father of king David. And king David was the father of Solomon, by her that had been the wife of Urias. Solomon was the father of Roboam, Roboam of Abias, Abias of Asa, Asa of Josaphat, Josaphat of Joram, Joram of Ozias, Ozias of Joatham, Joatham of Achaz, Achaz of Ezechias, Ezechias of Manasses, Manasses of Amon, Amon of Josias; and Josias was the father of Jechonias and his brethren, at the time of the removal to Babylon.  And after the removal to Babylon, Jechonias was the father of Salathiel, Salathiel of Zorobabel,  Zorobabel of Abiud, Abiud of Eliacim, Eliacim of Azor, Azor of Sadoc, Sadoc of Achim, Achim of Eliud,  Eliud of Eleazar, Eleazar of Mathan, Mathan of Jacob, and Jacob was the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary; it was of her that Jesus was born, who is called Christ.