Saturday, 2 July 2016

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

The Matins readings in the traditional Benedictine Office for the Seventh Sunday after Pentecost are set out below.

Nocturn I (III=I Kings:1-1-15)

Reading 1: And now David had grown old, and so chilled with age that there was no warming him by heaping coverlets on his bed; so his attendants asked leave of him to go and find a young maid, who should be brought to the court and cherish him by sleeping in his bosom, to give their royal master warmth. And of all the fair maids in Israel they chose out one, Abisag from Sunam, who was brought into the king’s presence

R. Prepare your hearts unto the Lord, and serve Him Only * And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.
V. Return unto Him with all your hearts, and put away the strange gods from among you.
R. And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.

Reading 2: a fair maid indeed, who now shared the king’s bed and waited on him, yet never did the king mate with her. Meanwhile Adonias, David’s son by Haggith, aspired to win the throne; he must drive in state, with chariots and outriders, and fifty men to run before him;  and never a word did his father say to check or challenge him.

R. God, Which heareth all, even He sent His Angel, and took me from keeping my father's sheep, and * Anointed me with the oil of His mercy.
V. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear
R. And anointed me with the oil of His mercy.

Reading 3: he came next to Absalom in birth, and was like Absalom for beauty. Joab, son of Sarvia, and the priest Abiathar were in his confidence; but, while these favoured Adonias’s cause, he could not win over the priest Sadoc, and Banaias son of Joiada, and the prophet Nathan, Semei and Rei and the picked men of David’s army.

R. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear * He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.
V. God hath sent forth His mercy and His truth, and delivered my soul from among the lion's whelps.
R. He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.

Reading 4: Thereupon Nathan said to Solomon’s mother Bethsabee, Hast thou heard the news that Haggith’s son Adonias has come to the throne, and our lord king David none the wiser? Act quickly, following the advice I now give thee, if thou wouldst protect thyself, and thy son Solomon, from mortal peril. Go and demand access to king David’s presence; ask him openly, My lord King, didst thou not promise me, thy handmaid, upon oath, to let my son Solomon be thy heir, and succeed to thy throne? How comes it that Adonias is king? And while thou art still speaking, I will come in after thee, and lend weight to these words of thine. So Bethsabee gained access to the king’s own room, where he sat, an old, old man, with Abisag the Sunamite in attendance on him.

R. Remember, O Lord, thy covenant, and say unto the destroying Angel: Stay now thine hand * That the land be not utterly laid waste, and that thou destroy not every living soul.
V. Even I it is that have sinned, and done evil indeed but these sheep what have they done? Let thine anger, I pray thee, O Lord, be turned away from thy people.
R. That the land be not utterly laid waste, and that Thou destroy not every living soul.

Nocturn II (St Jerome, Letter 52)

Reading 5: Then David, who had once been a man of war, was seventy years old, the chill of old age came upon him, and he could get no heat. So they sought out for him throughout all the coasts of Israel Abishag the Shunamite, to sleep with the king and to warm his aged body. Who is this Shunamite, wife and yet virgin, so hot, that she could heat the chilly, so holy, that her warmth provoked him not to lust.

R. Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.* Because the hand of the Lord was with him, he smote the Philistine, and took away the reproach from Israel.
V. Is not this David? Did they not sing one to another of him in dances, saying Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands?
R. Because the hand of the Lord was with him, he smote the Philistine, and took away the reproach from Israel.

Reading 6: Let Solomon the Wise explain his father's enjoyment, and the "Peaceful One" tell of the warrior's embraces. "Get wisdom, get understanding forget it not, neither decline from the words of my mouth forsake her not, and she shall preserve thee love her, and she shall keep thee. Wisdom is the principal thing therefore get wisdom and with all thy getting, get understanding. Exalt her, and she shall promote thee. Honour her, and she shall embrace thee, and shall give to thine head an ornament of grace. She shall compass thee like a crown of delights."

R. Ye mountains of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither let there be rain upon you * For there are the mighty of Israel fallen
V. All ye mountains that stand round about, the Lord look upon you but let Him pass by Gilboa
R. For there are the mighty of Israel fallen

Reading 7: In old men almost all the powers of the body become weakened, and while wisdom only is increasing, all things else beside wisdom fail. Then faileth strength for fasting, for watching, for "chameuniae," (that is, sleeping on the floor,) for wandering hither and thither, for receiving strangers, for defending the poor, for instance and constancy in prayer, for visiting the sick, for that work with the hands whence alms are given. I need not treat of this with long talk, but, in short, when the body is broken down, all the works of the body wax enfeebled.

R. Thus saith the Lord I took thee out of thy father's house, and appointed thee to be ruler over My people, over Israel * And I was with thee whithersoever thou wentest, to establish thy kingdom for ever.
V. And I have made thee a great name, like unto the name of the great men that are in the earth and have caused thee to rest from all thine enemies.
R. And I was with thee whithersoever thou wentest, to establish thy kingdom for ever.

Reading 8: Don't either do I say, on the other hand, that wisdom, which in many old men drivelleth into second childhood, is weak, or wanting in such of the young and stout, as win knowledge by work and earnest study, by holiness of life and instancy of prayer to the Lord Jesus, but this I do say, that the more spiritual faculties have in youth many wrestlings with the body to go through, and that, what with violent provocations to vice, and what with the sensual ticklings of the flesh, they are apt to be smothered like fire among green wood, and not able to blaze forth in all their brightness. But when old age cometh upon them, who have spent their youth in acquiring sound knowledge, and have meditated in the law of the Lord day and night, it hath this effect on them, to make them more learned by their increased years, more experienced by constant use, more wise, through the advance of time and, in short, doth offer them the rich harvest of their past diligence.

R. O Lord, Thou hast hearkened unto the prayer of thy servant, that I might build a temple unto thy Name,* O God of Israel, bless Thou, and hallow this house for ever.
V. O Lord, Who keepest covenant with thy servants that walk before thee in all their heart.
R. O God of Israel, bless Thou, and hallow this house for ever.

Nocturn III (St Hilary)

Reading 9: The Lord here warneth us that we must rate the worth of soft words and seeming meekness, by the fruits which they that manifest such things bring forth in their works, and that we should look, in order to see what a man is, not at his professions, but at his deeds. For there are many in whom sheep's clothing is but a mask to hide wolfish ravening. But "Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Even so, every good tree bringeth forth good fruit, but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit." Thus, the Lord teacheth us, is it with men also evil men bring not forth good fruits, and hereby are we to know them.

R. My sins are many, yea, they are more in number than the sands of the sea; I am not worthy to look up toward heaven because of the multitude of my iniquities; for I have provoked thee to anger
* And done evil in thy sight.
V. For I acknowledge my transgression, and my sin is ever before me, for against thee only have I sinned
R. And done evil in thy sight.

Reading 10: Lip-service alone winneth not the kingdom of heaven, nor is every one that saith unto Christ, "Lord, Lord," an heir thereof.What use is there in calling the Lord, Lord? Would He not be Lord all the same, whether or not we called Him so What holiness is there in this ascription of a name, when the true way to enter into the kingdom of heaven is to do the will of our Father, Who is in heaven?

R. Hearken, O Lord, unto the cry and to the prayer which thy servant prayeth before thee today, that thine eyes may be open and thine ears attend;
* Toward this house day and night.
V. Look down from thine high and holy place, O Lord, even from heaven thy dwelling.
R. Toward this house, day and night.

Reading 11: "Many will say to Me in that day Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy Name?” Already here doth the Lord rebuke the deceit of the false prophets, and the feigning of the hypocrites, who take glory to themselves because of the power of their words, their prophesying in teaching, their casting out of devils, and such-like mighty works. Because of all these things they promised unto themselves that they shall enter into the kingdom of heaven as though in their words and works any good thing were their own, and not all the mighty working of that God upon Whom they call, since reading bringeth knowledge of doctrine, and the Name of Christ driveth out devils.

R. Lord, when thy people shall turn again to thee, and shall pray unto thee in this house
* then hear Thou in heaven, O Lord, and deliver them out of the hand of their enemies.
V. If thy people sin against thee, and turn again, and repent, and come and pray unto thee in this house.
R. Then hear Thou in heaven, O Lord, and deliver them out of the hand of their enemies.

Reading 12: That which is needed on our part to win that blessed eternity, that of our own which we must give, is to will to do right, to turn away from all evil, to obey with our whole heart the commandments laid on us from heaven, and so to become the friends of God. It should be ours rather to do God's will, than to boast of God's power. And we must put off from us and thrust away such as are by their wicked works already estranged from His friendship.

R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

This Sunday's Gospel is from St Matthew 7:

Attendite a falsis prophetis, qui veniunt ad vos in vestimentis ovium, intrinsecus autem sunt lupi rapaces: a fructibus eorum cognoscetis eos. Numquid colligunt de spinis uvas, aut de tribulis ficus? Sic omnis arbor bona fructus bonos facit: mala autem arbor malos fructus facit. Non potest arbor bona malos fructus facere: neque arbor mala bonos fructus facere. Omnis arbor, quæ non facit fructum bonum, excidetur, et in ignem mittetur. Igitur ex fructibus eorum cognoscetis eos. Non omnis qui dicit mihi, Domine, Domine, intrabit in regnum cælorum: sed qui facit voluntatem Patris mei, qui in cælis est, ipse intrabit in regnum cælorum.

 Beware of false prophets, who come to you in the clothing of sheep, but inwardly they are ravening wolves.By their fruits you shall know them. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit, and the evil tree bringeth forth evil fruit. A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can an evil tree bring forth good fruit.  Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit, shall be cut down, and shall be cast into the fire. Wherefore by their fruits you shall know them.  Not every one that saith to me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven: but he that doth the will of my Father who is in heaven, he shall enter into the kingdom of heaven.

Friday, 1 July 2016

Feast of the Visitation (2 July)

Matins readings for the feast in the traditional Benedictine Office are set out below.

Nocturn I (Song of Songs 2)

Reading 1: Count me no more than wild rose on the lowland plain, wild lily on the mountain slopes. A lily, matched with these other maidens, a lily among the brambles, she whom I love! An apple-tree in the wild woodland, shade cool to rest under, fruit sweet to the taste, such is he my heart longs for, matched with his fellow. Into his own banqueting-hall the king has brought me, shewn me the blazon of his love. Cushioned on flowers, apples heaped high about me, and love-sick all the while!

R. Rise up, make haste, my love my fair one and come away For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone.
* The voice of the turtle-dove is heard in our land.
V. Mary entered into the house of Zacharias and saluted Elizabeth.
R. The voice of the turtle-dove is heard in our land.

Reading 2: His left hand pillows my head; his right hand, even now, ready to embrace me. An oath, maidens of Jerusalem! By the gazelles and the wild fawns I charge you, wake never from her sleep my heart’s love, till wake she will! The voice I love! See where he comes, how he speeds over the mountains, how he spurns the hills! Gazelle nor fawn was ever so fleet of foot as my heart’s love. And now he is standing on the other side of this very wall; now he is looking in through each window in turn, peering through every chink.

R. Who is this that cometh up like the sun This, comely as Jerusalem
* The daughters of Zion saw her, and called her blessed the queens also, and they praised her.
V. And about her it was as the flower of roses in the spring of the year, and lilies of the valleys.
R. The daughters of Zion saw her, and called her blessed the queens also, and they praised her.

Reading 3: I can hear my true love calling to me: Rise up, rise up quickly, dear heart, so gentle, so beautiful, rise up and come with me. Winter is over now, the rain has passed by.  At home, the flowers have begun to blossom; pruning-time has come; we can hear the turtle-dove cooing already, there at home.  There is green fruit on the fig-trees; the vines in flower are all fragrance.

R. Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost and she spake out with a loud voice, and said: Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the Fruit of thy womb
* And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?
V. For, lo, as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in mine ears, the babe leaped in my womb for joy.
R. And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?

Reading 4: Rouse thee, and come, so beautiful, so well beloved, still hiding thyself as a dove hides in cleft rock or crannied wall. Shew me but thy face, let me but hear thy voice, that voice sweet as thy face is fair.How was it they sang? Catch me the fox, the little fox there, thieving among the vineyards; vineyards of ours, all a-blossoming! All mine, my true love, and I all his; see where he goes out to pasture among the lilies, till the day grows cool, and the shadows long. Come back, my heart’s love, swift as gazelle or fawn out on the hills of Bether.

Nocturn II (St John Chrysostom)

Reading 5: As soon as our Redeemer was come among us, He went with haste, while as yet He was in His mother's womb, to visit His friend John. And John, in the one womb, becoming conscious of the Presence of Jesus in the other womb, dashed himself impatiently against the narrow walls of his natural prison, as though crying out: I see the very Lord who hath given nature her bounds, and I wait not for the due season of my birth. There is no need for me to linger here till nine months are ended, for He That is Eternal is with me! I will break out of my dark cell; I will proclaim my full knowledge of many wonders. I am the sign. I will show that the Christ is here. I am the trumpet; let me peal forth the news that the Son of God is come in the flesh. Let me give my trumpet-note, let me bless my father's tongue, and make it to speak again. Let me give my trumpet-note, let me quicken my mother's womb.

R. Behold, he cometh leaping upon the mountains, skipping upon the hills;* My beloved is like a gazelle or a young roe-buck!
V. He rejoiceth as a giant to run his course, his going-forth is from the end of the heavens.
R. My beloved is like a gazelle or a young roe-buck!

Reading 6: Thou seest, O beloved, how new and how strange a mystery is here! John is not born, but by leaping he speaketh; he is yet unseen, and he giveth warning; he is not yet able to cry, but by his acts he is heard. He draweth not yet the breath of life, but he preacheth God. he seeth not yet the light, but he maketh known the Sun! He is not come out of the womb, but he hasteth to play the Fore-runner in the Presence of the Lord. He cannot restrain himself; he rebelleth against the bounds set by nature, and struggleth to break out of the prison of the belly. His longing is to herald the coming Saviour. He saith, as it were: Behold, the Deliverer cometh and am I to remain still bound to abide here? The Word cometh, that He may set right all things and am I still to tarry in prison? I will go forth. I will run before Him, and cry aloud to all men: “Behold the Lamb of God Which taketh away the sin of the world.”

R. Rejoice with me, rejoice with me, all ye that love the Lord, for, while I was yet a little one, I pleased the Most High,
* And I have brought forth from my bowels God and man.
V. All generations shall call me blessed, for God hath regarded the low estate of His hand-maiden.
R. And I have brought forth from my bowels God and man.

Reading 7: But do thou tell us, O John, how it came to pass that while thou wast still in the darkness of thy mother's womb, thou didst see and hear? How didst thou behold the things of God? How didst thou leap and bound for joy? Great, saith John, is the mystery of that which taketh place here, far from the understanding of men are these doings. It is meet that I should do a new thing in nature for the sake of Him Who is making new things which are beyond nature.
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

R. Blessed art thou that hast believed, for there shall be a performance of those things which were told thee from the Lord. And Mary said:* My soul doth magnify the Lord.
V. Come, hear, and I will declare what God hath done for my soul.
R. My soul doth magnify the Lord.

Reading 8: I see in the womb, because I see the Sun of righteousness in a womb. I hear, because I am coming as the herald of the Great Word. I cry out, because I espy the Only-begotten Son of the Father clad in Flesh. I bound for joy, because I see that He by Whom all things were made, hath taken upon Him the form of a servant. I leap, because I think of the Redeemer of the world being made Flesh. I run before His coming, and herald His approach unto you with this, as it were, my confession.

Nocturn III (St Ambrose)

Reading 9: We must here consider that the greater cometh unto the lesser, Mary unto Elizabeth, Christ unto John. And again afterwards, to hallow the baptism of John, the Lord came unto him to be baptized. It was soon that the blessings of the coming of Mary and of the Presence of God were made manifest. Have regard here to the distinction made, and to the special weight of every word. Elizabeth was the first to hear the voice of Mary's salutation, but John was the first to receive grace.

R. All generations shall call me blessed,* For the Lord, That is mighty, hath done to me great things, and holy is His Name.
V. And His mercy is on them that fear Him, from generation to generation.
R. For the Lord, That is mighty, hath done to me great things, and holy is His Name.

Reading 10: She heard naturally, but he leaped mystically. She hailed the coming of Mary, he that of the Lord, Mary and Elizabeth spake words full of grace, but Jesus and John worked, and commenced their mystery of godliness from their mothers' beginnings, and so by twin miracles the mothers prophesied from the spirit of their unborn offspring. The babe leaped, and the mother was filled with the Holy Ghost. The mother was not filled before the son, but when the son was filled with the Holy Ghost, he filled his mother also.

R. O Holy Virgin Mary, happy indeed art thou, and right worthy of all praise,* For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness, * Even Christ our God.
V. Pray for the people, plead for the clergy, make intercession for all women vowed to God; may all that make remembrance of thine holy Visitation feel the might of thine assistance.
R. For out of thee rose the Sun of righteousness.

Reading 11: And whence is this to me, that the Mother of my Lord should come to me? That is to say, How cometh it to pass that so great a good should befall me, as that the Mother of my Lord should come to me I feel the miracle, I acknowledge the mystery the Mother of my Lord, pregnant with the Word, is full of God. And Mary abode with her about three months, and returned to her own house. It is meet to record how Mary showed this kindness, and abode this mystic number of months.

Reading 12: She tarried long, not only for friendship's sake, but also for the good of the Great Prophet. For if the first coming of Mary so blessed him, that even as a babe in the womb he leapt for joy, and his mother was filled with the Holy Ghost, what blessedness must we not deem to have flowed upon him from so long neighbourhood of Mary. Thus was the Prophet anointed, and trained by exercise like a strong wrestler, in his mother's womb, for his sinews were being braced for a hard battle.

Gospel: Luke 1:39-47

Exsurgens autem Maria in diebus illis, abiit in montana cum festinatione, in civitatem Juda: et intravit in domum Zachariæ, et salutavit Elisabeth. Et factum est, ut audivit salutationem Mariæ Elisabeth, exsultavit infans in utero ejus: et repleta est Spiritu Sancto Elisabeth: et exclamavit voce magna, et dixit: Benedicta tu inter mulieres, et benedictus fructus ventris tui. Et unde hoc mihi, ut veniat mater Domini mei ad me?  Ecce enim ut facta est vox salutationis tuæ in auribus meis, exsultavit in gaudio infans in utero meo. Et beata, quæ credidisti, quoniam perficientur ea, quæ dicta sunt tibi a Domino. Et ait Maria: Magnificat anima mea Dominum:  et exsultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutari meo.

 And Mary rising up in those days, went into the hill country with haste into a city of Juda. And she entered into the house of Zachary, and saluted Elizabeth.  And it came to pass, that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the infant leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost:  And she cried out with a loud voice, and said: Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb. And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?  For behold as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in my ears, the infant in my womb leaped for joy. And blessed art thou that hast believed, because those things shall be accomplished that were spoken to thee by the Lord. And Mary said: My soul doth magnify the Lord. And my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. 

Thursday, 30 June 2016

Hebrews 7:1-10 - Between God and the people

Chapter 7 of Hebrews brings us to the heart of the argument about the superiority of Christ's priesthood.  St Thomas Aquinas summarises this section as follows:
"In Chapter 5 the Apostle proved that Christ is a priest, but in Chapter 6 he interposed certain considerations to prepare the minds of his hearers. Now he returns to his main theme: for he intends to prove the excellence of Christ’s priesthood over the Levitical priesthood. In regard to this he does two things: first, he shows the excellence of Christ’s priesthood as compared to the priesthood of the Old Testament; secondly, he shows that believers should subject themselves reverently to the priesthood of Christ."

Hebrews 7:1-2a:
It was this Melchisedech, king of Salem, and priest of the most high God, who met Abraham and blessed him on his way home, after the defeat of the kings; and to him Abraham gave a tenth of his spoils. 
Hic enim Melchisedech, rex Salem, sacerdos Dei summi, qui obviavit Abrahæ regresso a cæde regum, et benedixit ei: cui et decimas omnium divisit Abraham: 
Aquinas:

Who was Melchizedek?: He describes Melchizedek, first of all, by his name when he says, For this Melchizedek. For so the Scripture names him in Genesis, where his history, which the Apostle supposes here, is recorded.

King of Salem: Some say that Salem is called Jerusalem. But Jerome denies this in a letter, because, as he says, he could not run into him from Jerusalem, which he proves from its location. Others say that Salem is the place where John baptized, and the walls of that place still existed in Jerome’s time.

Priest of God: ...lest anyone suppose that he was a priest of idols, he adds, of the Most High God, namely, God by essence not by participation or name. For God is the Creator of all who are gods either by participation or erroneously: ‘The Lord is a great king above all gods’; ‘You shall be called priests of the Lord: to you it shall be said: You ministers of our God’.

Functions of a priest: ...he describes him from his office: who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings and blessed him. For a priest is midway between God and the people. Therefore, he should confer something on the people, namely, spiritual things, and receive something from them, namely, temporal things: ‘If we then have sown unto you spiritual things, is it a great matter, if we reap your carnal things?’

Hebrews 2b-3
Observe, in the first place, that his name means, the king of justice; and further that he is king of Salem, that is, of peace. That is all; no name of father or mother, no pedigree, no date of birth or of death; there he stands, eternally, a priest, the true figure of the Son of God.
primum quidem qui interpretatur rex justitiæ: deinde autem et rex Salem, quod est, rex pacis, 3 sine patre, sine matre, sine genealogia, neque initium dierum, neque finem vitæ habens, assimilatus autem Filio Dei, manet sacerdos in perpetuum.
Aquinas:

Christ's likeness to Melchizedek as king: ...Melchizedek, who is first, by translation of his name, king of righteousness, and signifies Christ, Who was a king..:He is not only called righteous, but king of righteousness, because He was made wisdom and righteousness for us. Another thing said of him is his status; hence, he is called king of Salem, that is, king of peace. But this suits Christ: ‘For he is our peace’...He does well to join justice and peace, because no one can make peace who does not observe justice...

Melchizedek is not Christ: Then when he says, without father or mother or genealogy, he presents a likeness in regard to the things not mentioned about him, because in Scripture no mention is made of his father or mother or genealogy. Hence, some of the ancients made this matter of their error, saying that since God alone is without beginning and without end, Melchizedek was the Son of God. But this has been condemned as heretical.

No mother or father: Hence, it should be noted that the Old Testament, whenever mention is made of some important person, his father is named along with the time of his birth and death, as in the case of Isaac and many others....For inasmuch as it is said, without father, the birth of Christ from the Virgin is signified, for it occurred without a father: ‘That which is born in her is of the Holy Spirit’. Now that which is proper to God should not be attributed to a creature; but it is proper to God the Father to be the Father of Christ. Therefore, in the birth of the one who prefigured Him, no mention should be made of a carnal father.   Also in regard to His eternal birth he says, without mother, lest anyone suppose that birth to be material, as the mother gives the matter to her begotten; but it is spiritual, as brightness from the sun: ‘Who being the brightness of his glory and figure of his substance'

No pedigree: ...because the generation of Christ is ineffable: ‘Who shall declare his generation’; the other is because Christ, Who is introduced as a priest, does not pertain to the Levitical priesthood, nor to a genealogy of the Old Law. This is the Apostle’s intention; hence, he says, and has neither beginning of days nor end of life. But he says this, not because Christ was not born in time or did not die, but because of His eternal generation, in which He was born without the beginning of any time: ‘In the beginning was the Word’, i.e., no matter what time you mention, the Word was before it, as Basil explains. Also, no end of life: this is true in regard to His divinity, which is eternal. But in regard to His humanity, He no longer has an end of life, because ‘Christ rising again from the dead, dies now no more’; and below: ‘Jesus Christ, yesterday, and today; and the same forever.’

A priest forever: lest anyone suppose that Christ’s priesthood is later than that of Melchizedek, the Apostle dispels this, because, although Christ as man was born after him and existed in time, nevertheless, as God and as the Son of God, He exists from eternity. Therefore, Melchizedek was like Christ, the Son of God, in regard to all those features: and this inasmuch as He continues a priest forever, which can be explained in two ways: one way, because no mention is made of the end of his priesthood or of his successor: ‘I have used similitudes by the ministry of the prophets’. He also says, a priest forever, because that which is prefigured, namely, Christ’s priesthood, lasts forever. Hence, even in Scripture it is frequently referred to as perpetual: ‘It shall be a perpetual observance’: ‘By a perpetual service and rite’, because that which was symbolized by it is perpetual. In this matter the Apostle connects the following with the preceding.

Hebrews 7:4-10
4 Consider how great a man was this, to whom the patriarch Abraham himself gave a tenth part of his chosen spoil. The descendants of Levi, when the priesthood is conferred on them, are allowed by the provisions of the law to take tithes from God’s people, although these, like themselves, come from the privileged stock of Abraham; after all, they are their brothers; here is one who owns no common descent with them, taking tithes from Abraham himself. He blesses him, too, blesses the man to whom the promises have been made; and it is beyond all question that blessings are only given by what is greater in dignity to what is less. In the one case, the priests who receive tithe are only mortal men; in the other, it is a priest (so the record tells us) who lives on. And indeed, there is a sense in which we can say that Levi, who receives the tithe, paid tithe himself with Abraham; as the heir of Abraham’s body, he was present in the person of his ancestor, when he met Melchisedech.
Intuemini autem quantus sit hic, cui et decimas dedit de præcipuis Abraham patriarcha.  Et quidem de filiis Levi sacerdotium accipientes, mandatum habent decimas sumere a populo secundum legem, id est, a fratribus suis: quamquam et ipsi exierint de lumbis Abrahæ. Cujus autem generatio non annumeratur in eis, decimas sumpsit ab Abraham, et hunc, qui habebat repromissiones, benedixit. Sine ulla autem contradictione, quod minus est, a meliore benedicitur. Et hic quidem, decimas morientes homines accipiunt: ibi autem contestatur, quia vivit. Et (ut ita dictum sit) per Abraham, et Levi, qui decimas accepit, decimatus est: adhuc enim in lumbis patris erat, quando obviavit ei Melchisedech.
Aquinas:

Abraham's tithing: hence, he says, see how great, i.e., of what great dignity, he is, to whom Abraham the patriarch gave a tithe of the spoils...Abraham is called a patriarch, i.e., the chief of fathers, not because he had no father, but because the promise of being father of the Gentiles was made to him... the Levites themselves were of the seed of Abraham and, consequently were inferior to Abraham, who paid the tithes...But this man who has not the genealogy received tithes of Abraham, he shows how it was more fitting for Melchizedek to receive tithes, because he was not of the stock of Abraham; hence, he has not their genealogy, namely, of the Levites.

Above the law: Furthermore, according to a commandment of the Law it was lawful for him [Aaron] to take tithes; consequently, their priesthood was subject to the observance of the Law. But he [Melchizedek] took tithes not by reason of any law but of himself; therefore, his priesthood was a figure of Christ’s priesthood, which is not subject to the Law. Likewise, they received from a lowly people, namely, their brethren, but he from the highest, namely, from Abraham...

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Hebrews 6:11-20 - The need for fervour

The second half of Hebrews 6 stresses the continuity between the Old and New Testaments:
11-12 And we desire that every one of you shew forth the same carefulness to the accomplishing of hope unto the end: That you become not slothful, but followers of them, who through faith and patience shall inherit the promises.
 Cupimus autem unumquemque vestrum eamdem ostentare sollicitudinem ad expletionem spei usque in finem: ut non segnes efficiamini, verum imitatores eorum, qui fide, et patientia hæreditabunt promissiones.
Aquinas:

The need for care: ...it is clear that carefulness is required for doing acts of godliness: ‘Martha, Martha, you are careful’ and for one’s own salvation: ‘Carefully study to present yourself approved unto God’. Any why? To realize the full assurance of hope, namely, that by fulfilling what you have begun, you may obtain what you hope: ‘Hope confounds not’. And this, until the end: ‘For he that shall persevere to the end, he shall be saved’.

The danger of laziness: ...For laziness is the fear of a future good action, because one fears that he may fail or not repent: ‘The slothful man says: There is a lion in the way’. Hence, slothful persons always allege obstacles as an excuse...Be you, therefore, imitators of those who through faith, without which it is impossible to please God and patience against adversity, inherit the promises. For by formed faith and patience the promised inheritance is obtained: ‘The saints by faith conquered kingdoms, wrought justice, obtained promises’.

The example of the prophets: ...As if to say: Be not slothful, but rather imitate the example of the prophets: ‘For an example of suffering evil, of labor and of patience, take the prophets’; and of other saints, namely the apostles: ‘Be you followers of me, as I also am of Christ’. Be you, therefore, imitators of those who through faith, without which it is impossible to please God and patience against adversity, inherit the promises. For by formed faith and patience the promised inheritance is obtained: ‘The saints by faith conquered kingdoms, wrought justice, obtained promises'.
13-17 For God making promise to Abraham, because he had no one greater by whom he might swear, swore by himself, Saying: Unless blessing I shall bless thee, and multiplying I shall multiply thee. And so patiently enduring he obtained the promise. For men swear by one greater than themselves: and an oath for confirmation is the end of all their controversy. Wherein God, meaning more abundantly to shew to the heirs of the promise the immutability of his counsel, interposed an oath: 
Abrahæ namque promittens Deus, quoniam neminem habuit, per quem juraret, majorem, juravit per semetipsum, dicens: Nisi benedicens benedicam te, et multiplicans multiplicabo te.  Et sic longanimiter ferens, adeptus est repromissionem.  Homines enim per majorem sui jurant: et omnis controversiæ eorum finis, ad confirmationem, est juramentum.  In quo abundantius volens Deus ostendere pollicitationis hæredibus, immobilitatem consilii sui, interposuit jusjurandum: 
Aquinas:

The promise to Abraham: ‘To Abraham were the promises made and to his seed’. The reason for this is that by faith we adhere to God; consequently, by faith we obtain the promise. For the first example of faith was found in Abraham, and this because he was the first to withdraw from associating with unbelievers: ‘Go forth out of your country, and from your kindred, and out of your father’s house’; secondly, because he was the first to believe something above nature: ‘Who against hope believed in hope’. Hence, Genesis: ‘Abraham believed God and it was reputed to him unto justice.’ For he was the first to receive the seal of faith, namely, circumcision.

Genesis 12: 1-4 - 
Meanwhile, the Lord said to Abram, Leave thy country behind thee, thy kinsfolk, and thy father’s home, and come away into a land I will shew thee. Then I will make a great people of thee; I will bless thee, and make thy name renowned, a name of benediction;  those who bless thee, I will bless, those who curse thee, I will curse, and in thee all the races of the world shall find a blessing. So Abram went out, as the Lord bade him... 
Genesis 15:1-6 - 
...The Lord sent word to Abram in a vision, Have no fear, Abram, I am here to protect thee; thy reward shall be great indeed. But Abram answered, Lord God, what can this gift of thine be? I must go the way of childless men; Damascus here, the son of Eliezer, is but the son of my steward; to me (Abram added) thou hast given no children, so that all the heir I have is a slave born in my house. Whereupon the Lord sent word to him, This man shall not succeed thee; thou shalt have an heir sprung from thy own body. Then he took him out of doors, and said to him, Look up at the sky, and count, if thou canst, the stars in it; thy race, like these, shall be numberless. So Abram put his faith in God, and it was reckoned virtue in him.
 Hebrews 6:
18-20 That by two immutable things, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we may have the strongest comfort, who have fled for refuge to hold fast the hope set before us.  we have as an anchor of the soul, sure and firm, and which entereth in even within the veil; Where the forerunner Jesus is entered for us, made a high priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedech.
ut per duas res immobiles, quibus impossibile est mentiri Deum, fortissimum solatium habeamus, qui confugimus ad tenendam propositam spem,  quam sicut anchoram habemus animæ tutam ac firmam, et incedentem usque ad interiora velaminis, ubi præcursor pro nobis introivit Jesus, secundum ordinem Melchisedech pontifex factus in æternum.
The anchor of faith: Then when he says, we have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, he shows that faith will obtain that promise; and he makes use of a simile. For he compares hope to an anchor, which just as it secures ship in the sea, so hope secures the soul in God in this work, which is, as it were, a kind of sea: ‘So is this great sea, which stretches wide its arms’ (Ps. 103:25); hence, it is made of iron: ‘I know whom I have believed and I am certain’. Also it should be firm, so that is it is not easily removed from the ship; thus a man should be held fast to that hope as an anchor and hope is that the anchor is fixed to a low place, but hope is fixed in the highest, namely, to God. For nothing in the present life is so firm that the soul could be secure and at rest; hence, it says in Genesis that the dove found no place where her foot might rest.

The church and the tabernacle:  For the Apostle understand the present condition of the Church by the holy things that were in the tabernacle; but by the holy of holies, which was separated from the saints by a veil, he understands the state of future glory. Therefore, he wills that the anchor of our hope be fixed in that which is now veiled from our eyes: ‘The eye has not seen, O God, besides thee, what things you have prepared for them that wait for you’; ‘How great is the multitude of your sweetness, O Lord, which you have hidden for them that fear you!’.

Christ has entered behind the veil: This, our forerunner, who has entered there, has fixed there; hence, it says in John: ‘I go to prepare a place for you.’ He shall go up that shall open the way before them’. Therefore, he says that Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf within the veil and has fixed our hope there, as it says in the collect of vigil and of Ascension day. Yet because the high priest alone was permitted to enter within the veil, he says that Jesus has entered on our behalf, having become a high priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek. Notice how elegantly the Apostle returns to his main theme. For he had begun to speak of the priesthood and then digressed; but now he returns to it, as is obvious.

Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Feast of SS Peter and Paul

Matins readings for the feast.


Nocturn I (Acts 3:1-16)

Reading 1:  Peter and John were going up to the temple at the ninth hour, which is an hour of prayer,  when a man was carried by who had been lame from birth. Every day he was put down at what is called the Beautiful Gate of the temple, so that he could beg alms from the temple visitors. And he asked Peter and John, as he saw them on their way into the temple, if he might have alms from them. Peter fastened his eyes on him, as John did too, and said, Turn towards us; 5 and he looked at them attentively, hoping that something would be given him.

R. Simon Peter, before I called thee out of the ship, I knew thee, and appointed thee for a captain over My people.*And I have given unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven.
V. Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, shall be loosed in heaven.
R. And I have given unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven.

Reading 2: Then Peter said to him, Silver and gold are not mine to give, I give thee what I can. In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, rise up and walk. So, taking him by his right hand, he lifted him up; and with that, strength came to his feet and ankles; he sprang up, and began walking, and went into the temple with them, walking, and leaping, and giving praise to God.

R. Simon Peter, if thou lovest Me, feed My sheep. Lord, Thou knowest that I love thee. * I will lay down my life for thy sake.
V. If I should die with thee, I will not deny thee.
R. I will lay down my life for thy sake.

Reading 3: All the people, as they saw him walking and praising God, recognized him for the man who used to sit begging at the Beautiful Gate of the temple, and were full of wonder and bewilderment at what had befallen him. And he would not let go of Peter and John, so that all the crowd gathered about them in what is called Solomon’s Porch, beside themselves with wonder.

R. Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build My Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.* And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven.
V. Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, shall be loosed in heaven.
R. And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven.

Reading 4: Peter, when he saw it, addressed himself to the people; Men of Israel, he said, why does this astonish you? Why do you fasten your eyes on us, as if we had enabled him to walk through some power or virtue of our own? It is the God of Abraham and Isaac and Jacob, the God of our forefathers, who has thus brought honour to his Son Jesus. You gave him up, and disowned him in the presence of Pilate, when Pilate’s voice was for setting him free. You disowned the holy, the just, and asked for the pardon of a murderer, while you killed the author of life. But God has raised him up again from the dead, and we are here to bear witness of it.  Here is a man you all know by sight, who has put his faith in that name, and that name has brought him strength; it is the faith which comes through Jesus that has restored him to full health in the sight of you all.

Nocturn II (From the Sermons of Pope St Leo the Great. First for the Birthday of the Holy Apostles Peter and Paul).

Reading 5: Dearly beloved brethren, in the joy of all the holy Feast-days the whole world is partaker. There is but one love of God, and whatsoever is solemnly called to memory, if it hath been done for the salvation of all, must needs be worth the honour of a joyful memorial at the hands of all. Nevertheless, this feast which we are keeping to-day, besides that world-wide worship which it doth of right get throughout all the earth, doth deserve from this city of ours an outburst of gladness altogether special and our own. In this place it was that the two chiefest of the Apostles did so right gloriously finish their race. And upon this day whereon they lifted up that their last testimony, let it be in this place that the memory thereof receiveth the chiefest of jubilant celebrations. O Rome these twain are the men who brought the light of the Gospel of Christ to shine upon thee These are they by whom thou, from being the teacher of lies, wast turned into a learner of the truth.

R. Lord, if it be Thou, bid me come unto thee on the water
* And Jesus stretched forth His Hand, and caught him, and said unto him O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt
V. But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, he cried, saying Lord, save me
R. And Jesus stretched forth His Hand, and caught him, and said unto him O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt

Reading 6: These twain be thy fathers, these be in good sooth thy shepherds, these twain be they who laid for thee, as touching the kingdom of heaven, better and happier foundations, than did they that first planned thine earthly ramparts, wherefrom he that gave thee thy name took occasion to pollute thee with a brother's blood.These are they who have set on thine head this thy glorious crown, that thou art become an holy nation, a chosen people, a city both Priestly and Kingly, whom the Sacred Throne of blessed Peter hath exalted till thou art become the Lady of the world, unto whom the world-wide love for God hath conceded a broader lordship than is the possession of any mere earthly empire.

R. Arise, O Peter! Cast thy garment about thee, gird thee with strength for the saving of the nations.
* The chains are fallen off from thine hands.
V. The Angel of the Lord came upon him, and a light shined in the prison and he smote Peter on the side and raised him up, saying Arise up quickly.
R. The chains are fallen off from thine hands.

Reading 7: Thou wast once waxen great by victories, until thy power was spread haughtily over land and sea, but thy power was narrower then which the toils of war had won for thee, than that thou now hast which hath been laid at thy feet by the peace of Christ. It well suited for the doing of the work which God had decreed that the multitude of kingdoms should be bound together under one rule, and that so the universal preaching of the Gospel should find easier entry into all peoples, since all were governed by the empire of one city.

R. Thou art the Shepherd of the sheep, and the Prince of the Apostles, and unto thee hath God given all the kingdoms of the world.* Therefore unto thee hath He given the keys of the kingdom of heaven.
V. Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.
R. Therefore unto thee hath He given the keys of the kingdom of heaven.

Reading 8: But this city, knowing not Him, Who had been pleased to make her great, used her lordship over almost all nations to make herself the minister of all their falsehoods and seemed to herself exceeding godly because there was no false god whom she rejected. But the tighter that Satan had bound her, the more wondrous was the work of Christ in setting her free.


Nocturn III (from St Jerome)

Reading 9: Who do men say that I, the Son of man, am. This question is well put, for they who speak of Him as the Son of man are men, while they that know of Him that He is God are called not men but gods. And they said Some say that Thou art John the Baptist, some, Elias I marvel that some commentators have thought it worth their while to search into the origin of each of these blunders, and to engage in a discussion of weary length as to why some thought that our Lord Jesus Christ was John the Baptist, some, Elias and others, Jeremias, or one of the Prophets. Their blunders concerning Elias and Jeremias were but of a piece with Herod's concerning John the Baptist It is John, whom I beheaded he is risen from the dead and therefore mighty works do show forth themselves in him.

R. Peter, I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not;* And when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren.
V. Flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but My Father Which is in heaven.
R. And when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren

Reading 10: But who say ye that I am? Mark, discreet reader, from the context, that a distinction is here drawn between the Apostles and mere men. The Apostles are called gods. Who, asketh the Lord, do men say that I am but, on the other hand, who say ye that I am. They being but men deal in human speculations, but ye that are gods, who be ye persuaded that I am.

R. Jesus asked His disciples, saying: Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am? Peter answered, and said: Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God.
* And I say unto thee, that thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build My Church.
V. Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona, for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but My Father Which is in heaven.
R. And I say unto thee, that thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build My Church.

Reading 11: And then Peter, as the representative of all the Apostles, uttered the testimony: Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. He calleth God living, to mark the difference between Him and all other that be called gods, and who are indeed dead.And Jesus answered and said unto him Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona. The Apostle having testified of the Lord, the Lord in turn testifieth of the Apostle. Peter had said Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God and he received, in return for that his testimony to the truth, the words Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-jona. Why, blessed? For flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but My Father.

Reading 12:What flesh and blood could not reveal, the grace of the Holy Ghost had revealed. Meet for him therefore, because of his confession, is his name, as the name of one who hath revelation from the Holy Ghost, and therefore is called His son. Bar-jona is, being interpreted, The son-of-the-Dove.

The Gospel for the feast is from St Matthew:

13 Venit autem Jesus in partes Cæsareæ Philippi: et interrogabat discipulos suos, dicens: Quem dicunt homines esse Filium hominis? 14 At illi dixerunt: Alii Joannem Baptistam, alii autem Eliam, alii vero Jeremiam, aut unum ex prophetis. 15 Dicit illis Jesus: Vos autem, quem me esse dicitis? 16 Respondens Simon Petrus dixit: Tu es Christus, Filius Dei vivi. 17 Respondens autem Jesus, dixit ei: Beatus es Simon Bar Jona: quia caro et sanguis non revelavit tibi, sed Pater meus, qui in cælis est. 18 Et ego dico tibi, quia tu es Petrus, et super hanc petram ædificabo Ecclesiam meam, et portæ inferi non prævalebunt adversus eam. 19 Et tibi dabo claves regni cælorum. Et quodcumque ligaveris super terram, erit ligatum et in cælis: et quodcumque solveris super terram, erit solutum et in cælis.

[13] And Jesus came into the quarters of Caesarea Philippi: and he asked his disciples, saying: Whom do men say that the Son of man is? [14] But they said: Some John the Baptist, and other some Elias, and others Jeremias, or one of the prophets. [15] Jesus saith to them: But whom do you say that I am?
[16] Simon Peter answered and said: Thou art Christ, the Son of the living God. [17] And Jesus answering, said to him: Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father who is in heaven. [18] And I say to thee: That thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. [19] And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose upon earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven.

Monday, 27 June 2016

Vigil of SS Peter and Paul, Class II

The three readings of the Vigil are from St Augustine's Tractate 123 on John.

Reading 1: Continuation of the Holy Gospel according to John: At that time: Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? And so on, and that which followeth.

To the threefold denial there is now appended a threefold confession, that his tongue may not yield a feebler service to love than to fear, and imminent death may not appear to have elicited more from his lips than present life. Let it be the office of love to feed the Lord's flock, if it was the signal of fear to deny the Shepherd. Those who have this purpose in feeding the flock of Christ, that they may have them as their own, and not as Christ's, are convicted of loving themselves, and not Christ, from the desire either of boasting, or wielding power, or acquiring gain, and not from the love of obeying, serving and pleasing God.

R. Prepare your hearts unto the Lord, and serve Him Only * And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.
V. Return unto Him with all your hearts, and put away the strange gods from among you.
R. And He will deliver you out of the hand of your enemies.

Reading 2: Against such, therefore, there standeth as a wakeful sentinel this thrice inculcated utterance of Christ, of whom the Apostle complaineth that they seek their own, not the things that are of Christ Jesus. For what else signifieth the words: Lovest thou me? Feed my sheep: than if it were said: If thou lovest me, think not of feeding thyself, but feed my sheep as mine, and not as thine own; seek my glory in them, and not thine own; my dominion, and not thine; my gain, and not thine; lest thou be found in the fellowship of them that belong to the perilous times, lovers of their own selves, and all else that is joined on to this beginning of evils.

R. God, Which heareth all, even He sent His Angel, and took me from keeping my father's sheep, and * Anointed me with the oil of His mercy.
V. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear
R. And anointed me with the oil of His mercy.

Reading 3: With great propriety, therefore, is Peter addressed: Lovest thou me? and found replying: I love thee; and the command applied to him: Feed my lambs, and this a second and a third time. We have it also demonstrated here that love (amor) and liking (dilectio) are one and the same thing; for the Lord also in the last question said not: Dost thou like me? (Diligis me?): but: Dost thou love me? (Amas me?) Let us, then, love not ourselves but him; and in feeding his sheep, let us be seeking the things which are his, not the things which are our own. For in some inexplicable way, I know not what, every one that loveth himself, and not God, loveth not himself; and whoever loveth God, and not himself, he it is that loveth himself. For he that cannot live by himself will certainly die by loving himself; he therefore loveth not himself that loveth himself to his own loss of life.

R. The Lord That delivered me out of the mouth of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear * He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.
V. God hath sent forth His mercy and His truth, and delivered my soul from among the lion's whelps.
R. He will deliver me out of the hand of mine enemies.


Sunday, 26 June 2016

Index of posts on the Gospel of St Luke

For those who try and read the Gospels's each quarter, below is a list of my previous posts on the Gospel of St Luke, divided up so as to spread it over the three months from 1 July.

I've also cross-indexed its liturgical use (in the Extraordinary Form Mass), with links to any Patristic commentaries on it used in the Office that I've posted.

Useful Resources for the Gospel of St Luke


Patristic commentaries

Catena Aurea of St Thomas
Commentary of Cornelius de Lapide
St Cyril of Alexandria

Other

Divine Lamp's links list
Haydock's Bible Commentary

Posts on Gospel of St Luke


Reading Plan for Gospel of St Luke

Luke 1

 Luke 1:1-38
            Luke 1:26-38 (Ember Wednesday in Advent)
            Feast of the Annunciation - Luke 1:26-38
            Feast of the Immaculate Conception - Luke 1:26-28

Luke 1:39-47
          Ember Friday in Advent - Luke 1:39-47
          Feast of the Visitation - Luke 1:39-47
          Feast of the Assumption - Luke 1:41-50

Luke 48-55 (Magnificat Pt 1, Overview)
Luke 1:46-50 (Magnificat Pt 2)
Luke 1:51-55 (Magnificat Pt 3)
Luke 1 56-66
Luke 1:67-79 (Benedictus Pt 1)
Luke 1:76-79 - Benedictus Pt 2

Luke 2

Luke 2:1-20
        Matins for Christmas - Luke 2:1-14; 12-20
        Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas - Luke 2:15-20
Luke 2:21-39
        Octave of the Nativity (Circumcision of Our Lord) - Luke 2:21     
        Feast of the Most Holy Name of Jesus - Lk 2:21
        Feast of the Purification - Luke 2:22-32
        Sunday in the Octave of Christmas - Luke 2:33-40
Luke 2: 40-52
        First Sunday after Epiphany - Lk 2:42-52

Luke 3

Luke 3:1-22
        Ember Saturday in Lent - Luke 3:1-6
        Fourth Sunday of Advent - Luke 3:1-6
Luke 3:23-38

Luke 4

Luke 4:1-21
Luke 4:22-44
        Monday in the third week of Lent - Lk4:23-30
        Thursday in the third week of Lent: Lk4:38-44
         Saturday in Octave of Pentecost - Lk4:38-44

Luke 5

Luke 5:1-16
         Fourth Sunday after Pentecost - Lk 5:1-11
Luke 5:17-39
         Friday in Octave of Pentecost - Lk 5:17-26

Luke 6

Luke 6: 1-26
Luke 6:27-38
           Luke 6: 36-42 (weekdays after Trinity Sunday)
Luke 6:39-49

Luke 7

Luke 7:1-16
        Thursday in the fourth week of Lent - Lk7:11-16
Luke 7:17-35
Luke 7:36-50
          Thursday in Passion Week - Lk7:36-50; also Ember Thurs in September

Luke 8

Luke 8:1-21
         Sexagesima Sunday - Luke 8:4-15
Luke 8:22-56

Luke 9

Luke 9:1-17
        Thursday in Octave of Pentecost - Lk 9:1-6
Luke 9:18-27
Luke 9: 28-36 (Transfiguration)
Luke 9:37-62

Luke 10

Luke 10:1-24
        Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost - Lk 10:23-37
Luke 10:25-37
Luke 10:38-42

Luke 11

Luke 11:1-4 (The Our Father)
Luke 11:5-13 (also used for Mass of Rogation days before Ascension)
Luke 11: 14-36
Luke 11:37-54

Luke 12

Luke 12:1-12
Luke 12:13-34
        Third Sunday of Lent - Lk 11:14-28
Luke 12:35-59

Luke 13

Luke 13:1-21
              Ember Saturday in September: Luke 13:6-17
Luke 13:22-35

Luke 14

Luke 14:1-35
             Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost - Luke 14:1-11     
             Seventh Sunday after Pentecost - Luke 14:16-24

Luke 15

Luke 15:1-32
        Third Sunday after Pentecost - Lk 15:1-10
        Saturday in the second week of Lent - Luke 15:11-32

Luke 16

Luke 16:1-18
        Eighth Sunday after Pentecost - Luke 1-9
Luke 16:19-31
        Thursday in the Second Week of Lent - Luke 16:19-31
     
Luke 17

Luke 17:1-19
        Thirteen Sunday after Pentecost - Luke 17:11-19
Luke 17: 20-37

Luke 18

Luke 18:1-30
        Tenth Sunday after Pentecost - Lk 18:9-14
       Quinquagesima Sunday - Luke 18:11-43
Luke 18:31-43

Luke 19

Luke 19:1-28
Luke 19: 29-40
Luke 19:41-47
        Ninth Sunday after Pentecost - Luke 19:41-47

Luke 20

Luke 20:1-18
Luke 20:19-26
Luke 20:27-40
Luke 20:41-47

Luke 21

Luke 21:1-4
Luke 21:5-24
Luke 21:25-38
      Advent 1: Luke 21:25-33

Luke 22

Luke 22:1-23
Luke 22:24-38
Luke 22:39-46
Luke 22:47-62
Luke 22:63-71
        Mass of Wednesday in Holy Week - Luke 22:1-71; 23:1-53

Luke 23

Luke 23:1-25
Luke 23:26-44
Luke 23:45-56

Luke 24

Luke 24:1-12
Luke 24:13-35
        Monday in the Octave of Easter: Lk 24:13-35
Luke 24:36-45
        Tuesday in the Octave of Easter - Lk 24:36-47
Luke 24:46-53