Saturday, 30 January 2016

Matins readings for Sexagesima Sunday

Matins readings in the traditional Benedictine Office for Sunday are set out below.  You can find the readings for the rest of the week here..

Nocturn I: Genesis 5:32 - 6:15

Reading 1: And Noe, when he was five hundred years old, begot Sem, Cham, and Japheth.And after that men began to be multiplied upon the earth, and daughters were born to them, [2] The sons of God seeing the daughters of men, that they were fair, took to themselves wives of all which they chose. [3] And God said: My spirit shall not remain in man for ever, because he is flesh, and his days shall be a hundred and twenty years. 

R. The Lord said unto Noah: The end of all flesh is come before Me; for the earth is filled with violence through them.
* And I will destroy them with the earth.
V. Make thee an ark of planed timber, rooms shalt thou make in it.
R. And I will destroy them with the earth.

Reading 2: Now giants were upon the earth in those days. For after the sons of God went in to the daughters of men, and they brought forth children, these are the mighty men of old, men of renown. [5] And God seeing that the wickedness of men was great on the earth, and that all the thought of their heart was bent upon evil at all times,It repented him that he had made man on the earth.

R. Noah was a just man and perfect; he walked with God.
* According to all that God commanded him, so did he.
V. He made him an ark, that a seed of every sort might be saved alive.
R. According to all that God commanded him, so did he.

Reading 3:And being touched inwardly with sorrow of heart, [7] He said: I will destroy man, whom I have created, from the face of the earth, from man even to beasts, from the creeping thing even to the fowls of the air, for it repenteth me that I have made them. [8] But Noe found grace before the Lord. [9] These are the generations of Noe: Noe was a just and perfect man in his generations, he walked with God. [10] And he begot three sons, Sem, Cham, and Japheth.

R. Forty days and forty nights were the heavens opened; and there went into the ark two and two of all flesh wherein is the breath of life.
* And the Lord shut them in.
V. In the self-same day entered Noah into the ark, and his sons, and his wife, and the wives of his sons.
R. And the Lord shut them in.

Reading 4: And the earth was corrupted before God, and was filled with iniquity. [12] And when God had seen that the earth was corrupted (for all flesh had corrupted its way upon the earth,) [13] He said to Noe: The end of all flesh is come before me, the earth is filled with iniquity through them, and I will destroy them with the earth. [14] Make thee an ark of timber planks: thou shalt make little rooms in the ark, and thou shalt pitch it within and without. [15] And thus shalt thou make it: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits: the breadth of it fifty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits.

Nocturn II: From the book of St Ambrose on Noah and the Arc

Reading 5: We read that the Lord was angry. It is in the thoughts, that is to say, in the knowledge of God, that man being put on earth and weighted with the body cannot be without sin, for earth is the home of temptations, and the flesh is a bait for corruption. Yet man had a reasonable soul, and his soul had power to control his body; and, being so made, he made no struggle to keep himself from falling into that from whence he would not return. 

R. Noah built an Altar unto the Lord, and offered burnt offerings on the Altar; and the Lord smelled a sweet savour, and blessed Noah, and said:
* Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth.
V. Behold, I establish My covenant with you, and with your seed after you.
R. Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth.

Reading 6: God's thoughts are not as man's thoughts; in Him there is no such thing as change of mind, no such thing as to be angry and then cool down again. These things are written that we may know the bitterness of our sins, whereby we have earned the Divine wrath. To such a degree had iniquity grown that God, Who by His nature cannot be moved by anger, or hatred, or any passion whatsoever, is represented as provoked to anger.

R. The Lord said unto Noah: I do set My bow in the clouds of heaven,
* And I will remember My covenant which is between Me and you.
V. And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the heaven, that My bow shall be seen in the cloud.
R. And I will remember My covenant which is between Me and you

Reading 7: And God threatened that He would destroy man. He said: I will destroy man, whom I have created, from the face of the earth; both man and beast, and the creeping thing, and the fowls of the air. What harm had the animals done? For man's use had they been created, and, when man was wiped away, they were of use no longer. And there is an higher reason. Man is a living soul, capable of reason, who may be described as a living animal, subject to death, and endowed with reason. When then the highest animal is gone, why should the lower branches remain? Why should anything be saved alive, when righteousness, the basis of salvation, is to be no more?

R. By Myself have I sworn, saith the Lord. I will not again bring the waters of the flood upon the earth, I will remember My covenant.
* And the waters shall become no more a flood to destroy all flesh.
V. I do set My bow in the clouds, and it shall be for a token of a covenant between Me and the earth.
R. And the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh.

Reading 8: But more effectually to condemn the rest of men, and to manifest the goodness of God, it is written that Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord. Here we learn also that the sin of his neighbour casteth no shadow on the righteous, when he is kept as a stock from whence the whole race are to spring. He is praised, not because he was of a noble race, but because he was a just man and perfect. The stock of a just man yieldeth men of just souls; for virtues, like blood, are hereditary. Among men are some families illustrious for honourable pedigrees, and so there are also races of souls whose comeliness is the lustre of virtues.

Nocturn III: Homily 15 on the Gospels of St Gregory

Reading 9: Dearly beloved brethren, the passage from the Holy Gospel which ye have just heard, needeth not so much that I should explain it, as that I should seek to enforce its lesson. The Truth Himself hath explained it, and, after that, it beseemeth not man's frailty to fritter away His exposition by any further comment. But there is, in that very explanation by the Lord, somewhat, which it behoveth us well to weigh. If it were but we who bade you believe that by the seed is signified the word; by the field, the world; by the birds, the devils; and by the thorns, riches ye would perchance doubt of the truth of our explanation.

R. God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them:
* Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth.
V. Behold, I establish My covenant with you, and with your seed after you.
R. Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth.

Reading 10: Therefore the Lord Himself hath vouchsafed to give this explanation, and that, not for this parable only, but that ye may know in what manner to interpret others, whereof He hath not given the meaning.Beginning His explanation, the Lord saith that He speaketh in parables. Hereby He doth certify us, when our weakness would unveil to you the hidden meaning of His words.

R. Behold, I establish My covenant with you, and with your seed after you.
* Neither shall there any more be a flood to destroy the earth.
V. I do set My bow in the clouds, and it shall be for a token of a covenant between Me and the earth.
R. Neither shall there any more be a flood to destroy the earth.

Reading 11: If I spake of myself, who would believe me when I say that riches are thorns? Thorns prick, but riches lull to rest. And yet riches are indeed thorns, for the anxiety they bring is a ceaseless pricking to the minds of their owners, and, if they lead into sin, they are thorns which bloodily tear the soul. But we understand from another Evangelist that in this place the Lord speaketh, not of riches themselves, but of the deceitfulness of riches.


Reading 12: Those riches are deceitful riches, which can be ours only for a little while; those riches are deceitful riches, which cannot relieve the poverty of our souls. They are the only true riches, which make us rich in virtues. If then, dearly beloved brethren, ye seek to be rich, earnestly desire the true riches. If ye would be truly honourable, strive after the kingdom of heaven. If ye love the bravery of titles, hasten to have your names written down at Court above, where Angels are. Take to heart the Lord's words which your ear heareth. The food of the soul is the word of God when the stomach is sick it throweth up again the food which is put into it, and so is the soul sick when a man heareth and digesteth not in his memory the Word of God. And if any man cannot keep his food, that man's life is in desperate case.

R. When much people were gathered together to Jesus, and were come to Him out of every city, He spake by a parable:* A sower went out to sow his seed.
V. And, as he sowed, some fell on good ground, and sprang up, and bare fruit an hundred-fold.
R. A sower went out to sow his seed.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. A sower went out to sow his seed.

This Sunday's Gospel is St Luke 8: 4-15:

Cum autem turba plurima convenirent, et de civitatibus properarent ad eum, dixit per similitudinem: 5 Exiit qui seminat, seminare semen suum. Et dum seminat, aliud cecidit secus viam, et conculcatum est, et volucres cæli comederunt illud. 6 Et aliud cecidit supra petram: et natum aruit, quia non habebat humorem. 7 Et aliud cecidit inter spinas, et simul exortæ spinæ suffocaverunt illud. 8 Et aliud cecidit in terram bonam: et ortum fecit fructum centuplum. Hæc dicens clamabat: Qui habet aures audiendi, audiat.9 Interrogabant autem eum discipuli ejus, quæ esset hæc parabola. 10 Quibus ipse dixit: Vobis datum est nosse mysterium regni Dei, ceteris autem in parabolis: ut videntes non videant, et audientes non intelligant. 11 Est autem hæc parabola: Semen est verbum Dei. 12 Qui autem secus viam, hi sunt qui audiunt: deinde venit diabolus, et tollit verbum de corde eorum, ne credentes salvi fiant. 13 Nam qui supra petram, qui cum audierint, cum gaudio suscipiunt verbum: et hi radices non habent: qui ad tempus credunt, et in tempore tentationis recedunt. 14 Quod autem in spinas cecidit: hi sunt qui audierunt, et a sollicitudinibus, et divitiis, et voluptatibus vitæ euntes, suffocantur, et non referunt fructum. 15 Quod autem in bonam terram: hi sunt qui in corde bono et optimo audientes verbum retinent, et fructum afferunt in patientia.

Or:

[4] And when a very great multitude was gathered together, and hastened out of the cities unto him, he spoke by a similitude. [5] The sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some fell by the way side, and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it.[6] And other some fell upon a rock: and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it had no moisture. [7] And other some fell among thorns, and the thorns growing up with it, choked it. [8] And other some fell upon good ground; and being sprung up, yielded fruit a hundredfold. Saying these things, he cried out: He that hath ears to hear, let him hear. [9] And his disciples asked him what this parable might be. [10] To whom he said: To you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God; but to the rest in parables, that seeing they may not see, and hearing may not understand.[11] Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God. [12] And they by the way side are they that hear; then the devil cometh, and taketh the word out of their heart, lest believing they should be saved. [13] Now they upon the rock, are they who when they hear, receive the word with joy: and these have no roots; for they believe for a while, and in time of temptation, they fall away. [14] And that which fell among thorns, are they who have heard, and going their way, are choked with the cares and riches and pleasures of this life, and yield no fruit. [15] But that on the good ground, are they who in a good and perfect heart, hearing the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit in patience.

Saturday, 23 January 2016

Matins readings for Septuagesima Sunday

The Matins readings for the Sunday of Septuagesima in the Benedictine Office are set out below.

Nocturn I (Genesis 1)

Reading 1: [1] In the beginning God created heaven, and earth. [2] And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters. [3] And God said: Be light made. And light was made. [4] And God saw the light that it was good; and he divided the light from the darkness. [5] And he called the light Day, and the darkness Night; and there was evening and morning one day.[6] And God said: Let there be a firmament made amidst the waters: and let it divide the waters from the waters. [7] And God made a firmament, and divided the waters that were under the firmament, from those that were above the firmament, and it was so. [8] And God called the firmament, Heaven; and the evening and morning were the second day. 

R. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, wherein He made man also * After His own image and likeness.
V. So God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his face the breath of life.
R. After His own image and likeness.

Reading 2: God also said: Let the waters that are under the heaven, be gathered together into one place: and let the dry land appear. And it was so done. [10] And God called the dry land, Earth; and the gathering together of the waters, he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. [11] And he said: Let the earth bring forth the green herb, and such as may seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after its kind, which may have seed in itself upon the earth. And it was so done. [12] And the earth brought forth the green herb, and such as yieldeth seed according to its kind, and the tree that beareth fruit, having seed each one according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. [13] And the evening and the morning were the third day.

R. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, and the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.* And God saw everything that He had made, and it was very good.
V. Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the hosts of them.
R. And God saw everything that He had made, and it was very good.

Reading 3: [14] And God said: Let there be lights made in the firmament of heaven, to divide the day and the night, and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years: [15] To shine in the firmament of heaven, and to give light upon the earth. And it was so done.[16] And God made two great lights: a greater light to rule the day; and a lesser light to rule the night: and the stars. [17] And he set them in the firmament of heaven to shine upon the earth. [18] And to rule the day and the night, and to divide the light and the darkness. And God saw that it was good. [19] And the evening and morning were the fourth day.

R. The Lord formed man of the dust of the ground
* And breathed into his face the breath of life, and man became a living soul.
V. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, wherein He made man also.
R. And breathed into his face the breath of life, and man became a living soul.

Reading 4:  [20] God also said: Let the waters bring forth the creeping creature having life, and the fowl that may fly over the earth under the firmament of heaven.[21] And God created the great whales, and every living and moving creature, which the waters brought forth, according to their kinds, and every winged fowl according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. [22] And he blessed them, saying: Increase and multiply, and fill the waters of the sea: and let the birds be multiplied upon the earth. [23] And the evening and morning were the fifth day. [24] And God said: Let the earth bring forth the living creature in its kind, cattle and creeping things, and beasts of the earth, according to their kinds. And it was so done. [25] And God made the beasts of the earth according to their kinds, and cattle, and every thing that creepeth on the earth after its kind. And God saw that it was good. [26] And he said: Let us make man to our image and likeness: and let him have dominion over the fishes of the sea, and the fowls of the air, and the beasts, and the whole earth, and every creeping creature that moveth upon the earth.

Nocturn II (From the Enchirion of St Augustine)

Reading 5: The Lord threatened man with the punishment of death, in case he sinned. Thus did He gift him with free will, while He yet kept His lordship over him, and helped him with the dread of destruction. And so He put him in that happy garden, under the very shadow of the tree of life, in that good place from whence, had he kept his righteousness, he might have passed to a better.

R. God took the man and put him into the garden of Eden * To dress it and to keep it.
V. And the Lord God had planted a garden aforetime in Eden, and there He put the man whom He had formed.
R. To dress it and to keep it.

Reading 6: But the first man sinned, and was banished from Eden, and infected all his descendants with the disease of sin, poisoning their very root, and bringing upon all that sentence of death and damnation, which he had earned for himself. So that all that descend by fleshly generation from Adam, and from the guilty woman, who was the cause of his sin and the partaker of his punishment, derive from them original sin; whereby they are drawn through a way of divers sins and sorrows, towards that final ruin which they shall share with the rebel angels who are at once their corrupters, their lords, and their comrades.

R. The Lord God said: It is not good that the man should be alone.
* Let Us make an help meet for him.
V. But for Adam there was not found an help meet for him; and God said:
R. Let Us make an help meet for him.

Reading 7: So by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin, (and so death passed upon all men,) in whom all have sinned. By the world the Apostle signified! in this place all mankind. Thus then hath the matter stood. The damned mass of humanity lay in misery, or rather wallowed in it, and fell from bad to worse, till it joined the company of the sinning angels, and both together suffered the deserved punishment of their vile treason.

R. The Lord caused a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and He took one of his ribs.* And the rib which the Lord had taken from Adam made He a woman, and brought her unto Adam, to see what he would call her. And he called her name Woman, because she was taken out of Man.
V. And while he slept He took one of his ribs, and closed up the flesh instead thereof.
R. And the rib which the Lord had taken from Adam made He a woman, and brought her unto Adam, to see what he would call her.

Reading 8: So the wrath of God appertained whatever sin man, through the blind and untamed sting of his flesh, willingly committeth, and whatever punishment, declared and open, he unwillingly suffereth. There is, indeed, no pause in that goodness of the Creator whereby He giveth even to the traitor angels life and strength, (which if He gave not, they would be annihilated,) and whereby He formeth the seed of men, though they come of a corrupt and condemned stock, quickeneth them, strengtheneth and fitteth their limbs for the changing seasons of their life, extendeth their knowledge in divers places, and giveth them whereon to live. It hath been His will rather to draw good out of evil, than to suffer that there should be no evil.

Nocturn III (Homily 19 of St Gregory on the Gospels)

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew: In that time, Jesus said to his disciples: The kingdom of heaven is like to an householder, who went out early in the morning to hire labourers into his vineyard. And so on.

We hear that the kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, which went out early in the morning, to hire labourers into his vineyard. Who indeed is more justly to be likened to an householder than our Maker, Who is the Head of the household of faith, bearing rule over them whom He hath made, and being Master of His chosen ones in the world, as a Master over those that are in his house? He it is That hath the Church for a vineyard, a vineyard that ceaseth not to bring forth branches of the True Vine, from righteous Abel to the last of the elect that shall be born in the world.

R. And the Lord God had planted a garden aforetime in Eden,
* And there He put the man whom He had formed.
V. And out of the ground made the Lord God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food, the tree of life also in the midst of the garden.
R. And there He put the man whom He had formed.

Reading 10: This householder, then, for the cultivation of his vineyard, goeth out early in the morning, and at the third hour, and the sixth hour, and the ninth hour, and the eleventh hour, to hire labourers into his vineyard. Thus the Lord, from the beginning to the end of the world, ceaseth not to gather together preachers for the instruction of His faithful people. The early morning of the world was from Adam until Noah; the third hour from Noah until Abraham; the sixth hour from Abraham until Moses; the ninth hour from Moses until the coming of the Lord; the eleventh hour from the coming of the Lord until the end of the world. At this eleventh hour are sent forth as preachers the Holy Apostles, who have received full wages, albeit they be come in late.

R. Behold, Adam is become as One of Us, to know good and evil.
* See lest he take of the tree of life and live for ever.
V. Unto Adam also did the Lord God make a coat of skins, and clothed him, and said:
R. See lest he take of the tree of life and live for ever.

Reading 11: Nor the cultivation of His vineyard, (that is, the instruction of His people,) the Lord hath never ceased to send into it labourers. First, by the Fathers, then, by the Prophets and Teachers of the Law, and lastly, by the Apostles He hath dressed and tended the lives of His people, as the owner of a vineyard dresseth and tendeth it by means of workmen. 

R. The Lord said unto Cain: Where is Abel thy brother? Lord, I know not am I my brother's keeper? And He said unto him What hast thou done?
* Behold, the voice of thy brother Abel's blood crieth unto Me from the ground.
V. Cursed shalt thou be upon the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother's blood from thy hand.
R. Behold, the voice of thy brother Abel's blood crieth unto Me from the ground.

Reading 12: Whoever in whatever degree joined to a right faith the teaching of righteousness, was so far one of God's labourers in God's vineyard. By the labourers at early morning, and at the third hour, the sixth hour, and the ninth hour, may be understood God's ancient people, the Hebrews, who strove to worship Him with a right faith in company with His chosen ones from the very beginning of the world, and thus continually laboured in His vineyard. And now, at the eleventh hour, it is said unto the Gentiles also Why stand ye here all the day idle?

Notes on Genesis


Bodleian Library, 1481

This week marks the start of Septuagesimatide, and in the Office, the readings are from Genesis.

Genesis in the lectionary

The arrangement of the readings in the Office seem to imply that it should be read from Septuagesima Sunday up to about the Friday before the Fourth Sunday of Lent.  In essence, Genesis has 50 chapters in total - but the daily readings from Genesis at Matins stop at chapter fourteen on Shrove Tuesday.  Thereafter the daily readings thereafter are Patristic commentaries on the Gospel of the day (in the main).  On the Second Sunday of Lent however, the First Nocturn readings are from Genesis 27; for the Third Sunday of Lent they are from Genesis 37; and for the Fourth Sunday of Lent from Exodus 3.  Presumably the Scriptural readings originally continued right through this period, but at some point the Patristic ones were substituted in.

In fact Genesis is relatively little used in the traditional lectionary - apart from the Easter and Pentecost vigils it only appears at Mass on the Friday and Saturday after the second Sunday of Lent.  That is rather surprising given its importance and the amount of time the Fathers devoted to commentaries on it.

Authorship

Moses is traditionally regarded as the author of Genesis: ancient Jewish tradition holds that he was granted a vision of the creation of the universe and the early history of the world in the forty days he spent on Mt Sinai.

Importance

The concept that God created everything, including us, out of nothing, and that all of creation, all of history, continues to depend on his action is the most fundamental tenet of Christian belief, hence it forms the first line of the Creed.  The history that follows explains the relationship between God and his people through the successive covenants set out, explains why salvation through Christ was necessary, and presents for us important 'types' that foreshadow what was to come.  For this reason many of the Fathers wrote in depth commentaries on Genesis, dwelling on the first few chapters in particular at length.

Structure

The structure of Genesis essentially falls into two parts: chapters one to eleven deal with creation, including of Adam and Eve, and their descendants up to the time of Noah and the flood; chapters 12-50 deal with Patriarchs (chapters 12-14 concerning Abraham).

The subjects of the chapters can be summarised as follows:

Chs 1-11: Creation and Adam and Eve.

1-2 Creation of the universe
3 -   Expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden
4 - 5  Descendants up to Noah
         - Cain and Abel ch 4
         - second creation story, Seth to Noah
6-11 Flood and Noah’s descendants
        - the arc, chapter 7-8
        - the covenant with Noah, agriculture, ch 9
        - tower of babel, ch 10

Chs 12-50 Patriarchs

- Abraham 12-14
- Isaac 25-26
- Jacob 27-36
- Joseph 37-50

Commentaries

There are many wonderful commentaries on Genesis, far more than can be read in a few weeks.

Many of the Fathers wrote commentaries, particularly focusing on the creation of the universe (the six days of creation).  The key ones available online seem to be:


Take a look also at the resources over at the Divine Lamp.

Matins readings for the week of Septuagesima Sunday (Jan 24)

Septuagesima Sunday (Jan 24)

Nocturn I: 

Reading 1: Genesis 1 1:1-8
Reading 2: Genesis 1: 9-13
Reading 3: Genesis 1: 14-19
Reading 4: Genesis 1:20-26

Nocturn II: From St Augustine's Enchiridion (chapters 25-27)
Nocturn IIISt Gregory Homily 19 on the Gospels
GospelSt Matthew 20:1-16

Monday (Jan 25) - Conversion of Paul

Nocturn I:: Acts 9:1-5; 6-9; 10-16
Nocturn II: Acts 9:8-9

Tuesday (Jan 26)

:15-18; 19-20; 21-24

Wednesday (Jan 27) - St John Chrysostom

 Genesis 3:1-7;7-20; third reading on the saint

Thursday (Jan 29)

 Genesis 4:1-5; 8-12; 13-16

Friday (Jan 30)

Genesis 4:17-22; 23-26; 5:1-5

Saturday (Jan 31) - Of Our Lady

Genesis 5:15-21; 22-31; from Sermon 22 of St Leo

Saturday, 16 January 2016

Notes on II Corinthians



This week's Matins readings are from 2 Corinthians, so thirteen chapters to get through.

2 Corinthians was written around 57AD from Macedonia or Northern Greece, and very much follows from I Corinthians: some of those targeted by St Paul's previous letter seem to have responded by attacking his authority; this is his response to them.  The result is a defense of St Paul's mission, and a dissertation on the apostolic mission.

Theologically it is important in responding to the ever-present  problem of dissent in the Church.

The structure of the letter is fairly loose.  Chapters 1 to 7 review his relationship to the Corinthian Christian community, and defends his actions and conduct.  Chapters 8 and 9 solicit financial support for the church in Jerusalem.  And chapters 10 to 13 attacks his accusers.

Matins readings for the second week after Epiphany

The Matins readings in the traditional Benedictine Office this week are set out below.

Second Sunday after Epiphany (Jan 17)

Nocturn I2 Corinthians 1: 1-5, 6-7, 8-11, 12-13
Nocturn II: Sermon of St John Chrysostom (Preface to the letters of St Paul)
Nocturn III: Homily of St Augustine (Tract 9 on St John n2)
Gospel: John 2:1-11

Monday (Jan 18)

2 Corinthians 3: 1-3, 4-8, 9-14

Tuesday (Jan 19)

2 Corinthians 5: 1-4, 6-10, 11-15

Wednesday (Jan 20)

2 Corinthians 7: 1-3, 4-7, 8-10

Thursday (Jan 21) - Feast of St Agnes

If Class III:

2 Corinthians 10: 1-3, 4-12; St Ambrose Concerning Virginity, from Bk I , chap 2

If Class II (monasteries of nuns):

Nocturn I: Sirach 5: 1-3; 4-7; 8-1213-17
Nocturn II: St Ambrose, Concerning Virginity
Nocturn III: Homily 12 of St Gregory on the Gospels, n1 (Common of Virgins)

Friday (Jan 22)   

2 Corinthians 12: 1-4, 5-9, 9-11

Saturday (Jan 23) - Saturday of Our Lady

2 Corinthians 13: 1-4, 5-13; from Homily 22 of St Leo (III)

Saturday, 9 January 2016

Matins readings for the week of the first Sunday after Epiphany

Sunday 10 January: First Sunday after Epiphany

Nocturn I1 Corinthians I: 1-3; 4-9; 10-11; 12-13

Nocturn IISermon 36 of St Leo

Nocturn III: Homily of St Ambrose on St Luke 2:63-65 (not available)

GospelSt Luke 2: 42-52

Monday 11 January

1 Corinthians 2: 1-5; 6-9; 10-13

Tuesday 12 January

1 Corinthians 5: 1-5; 6-8; 9-11

Wednesday 13 January: Commemoration of the Baptism of Our Lord

Nocturn I: 1 Corinthians 6: 1-18, divided into four readings

Nocturn II: Sermon of St Gregory Nazianzen (from I, XV, XVI)

Nocturn III : Homily of St Augustine (Tract. 6 on John, n 7&8)

GospelSt John 1: 29-34

Thursday 14 January

1 Corinthians 7: 1-4; 5-9; 10-14

Friday 15 January

1 Corinthians 13: 1-3; 4-10; 11-13

Saturday 16 January (Saturday of Our Lady)

Readings 1&2 1 Corinthians 16: 1-4; 5-14
Reading 3: Of Our Lady for third Saturday in January (Sermon of Leo, 22: from II)

Friday, 8 January 2016

Notes on I Corinthians


Codex Amiatinus, c8th

The Matins readings for the first week after Epiphany are from 1 Corinthians, so once again I thought I'd provide some brief notes by way of an introduction.

At the moment the Breviary is following the order of the Bible: I Corinthians comes immediately after Romans (and next week's readings are from 2 Corinthians).  Like Romans it has sixteen chapters, so the Matins readings represent only a taster.

Context of I Corinthians

The community of Corinth had been evangelized by St Paul in 51-52 AD, but various divisions had arisen in the community.  According to the letter, St Paul had been alerted to these by various members of the community, and so is writing to try and resolve some of the problems and get the community back on the right path.

The problems in the fledgling community seem to have included deep divisions between its members, serious immorality, and doctrinal doubts.  Accordingly, St Paul offers advice on some specific questions about morality, practice, and doctrine.  Among the key themes are how a Christian should act differently to a non-believer, and the need for unity and order in the Church.

1 Corinthians contains many particularly memorable verses, and some whose meaning has been hotly disputed.

The letter was written from Ephesus (about 180 miles from Corinth by sea) somewhere between 53 and 57 AD.

Structure

The overall structure of 1 Corinthians is:

1.  Greeting and giving of thanks (1:1-9)

2.  A rather brutally honest description of, and set of remedies for, the causes of disunity and immorality that had arisen in the community (1:10-6:30).

3.  Answers to specific questions (7 – 15) – especially marriage and celibacy, food offered to idols, proprietary at the liturgy, gifts and graces, resurrection of the dead.

4. Epilogue (ch 16).

Commentaries

Good commentaries on 1 Corinthians available online include:


You might also want to take a look at the other resources linked to over at The Divine Lamp blog.

Other liturgical uses

Readings from I Corinthians are used in the lectionary for the Mass (in the Extraordinary Form) as follows:

1:4-8 - Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost
4:1-5 - Fourth Sunday of Advent
5:7-8 - Easter Sunday
9:24-27; 10:1-5a - Septuagesima Sunday
10:6-13  - Ninth Sunday after Pentecost
11:20-32 - Holy Thursday - The Lord's Supper
11:23-29 - Corpus Christi
12:2-11 - Tenth Sunday after Pentecost
13:1-13 - Quinquagesima Sunday
15:1-10 - Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost

Saturday, 2 January 2016

Matins readings for the second week after the Nativity

The Benedictine Patristic readings at Matins differ from the Roman this Sunday, and are unfortunately not available online as far as I can find.  Accordingly, I won't make a separate post for the Sunday, I'll just list what they are for reference purposes.

**I should note though, that readings set for the Roman Office this Sunday (both homilies by St Bernard) are those that were used in the Benedictine Office up until the 1962-3 revision of the breviary, and can be found online over at Divinum Officium.

Matins readings

Sunday 3 January - Second Sunday after the Nativity

Nocturn I (Romans readings for the date, split into four): Romans 6:1-18

Nocturn II: Sermon of St Augustine (Inter serm. suppos. Aug in Append 128 in Nat Dom 12)
Nocturn III: Sermon of St Jerome on Matthew 1, 2
GospelSt Matthew 2:19-23

Monday 4 January

Romans 7:1-3; 4-6; 7-9

Tuesday 5 January

Romans 8:1-4; 5-9; 9-11

Wednesday 6 January - Feast of the Epiphany (see separate post)

Nocturn I


Reading 1:Isaiah 55:1-4 

Reading 2: Isaiah 60:1-3;
Reading 3: Isaiah 60: 4-6
Reading 4: Isaiah 61:10-11; 62:1

Nocturn II: Sermon 32 of St Leo

Nocturn III: Homily 10 of St Gregory 
Gospel: St Matthew 2:1-12

Notes on St Matthew 2:1-12 (Gospel for the feast of the Epiphany) (Jan 6)

Thursday 7 January

Romans 9:1-5; 6-10; 11-16

Friday 8 January

Romans 12:1-3;4-8;9-16


Saturday 9 January

Romans 13:1-4; 4-7; 8-10.


Lectio on St Matthew

And for those wanting to do some lectio based on a systematic reading of the Gospel of St Matthew, here are links to a week's worth of notes:

St Matthew chapter 1

1:1-17
1:18-25 (Vigil of Christmas: 18-21)

St Matthew chapter 2

2:1-12 (Epiphany; Christmas Day post-communion)

2:1-3
2:4-6
2:7-12

2:13-23 (Holy Innocents: 2:13-18; Second Sunday after the Nativity: 2:19-23)

Matins readings for Lent: Index of posts

The weekday readings at Matins in the Benedictine Office during Lent (and the first week and a half of Passiontide) are generally Patristic texts on the Gospel of the Mass of the day (in the EF calendar).

Note: I'm planning to repost these during Lent 2016 and fill in any gaps (due to first class feasts in the year I originally posted them).  I'll also include the responsories where these are readily available online.  Accordingly links may not work temporarily (where I've scheduled them to appear at a particular time).

Ash Wednesday and days after

Gospel and readings for Ash Wednesday (St Matthew 6:16-21; St Augustine on the Sermon on the Mount)
Thursday after Ash Wednesday (St Matthew 6:5-13; St Augustine on the harmony of the Gospels)
Friday after Ash Wednesday (St Matthew 5:43-48; 6:1-4; Homily of St Jerome)
Saturday after Ash Wednesday (St Mark 6:47-56; Homily of St Bede)

First week of Lent (weekday readings are Patristic commentaries on the Gospel of the day)

First Sunday of Lent

Nocturn I: 2 Corinthians 6:1-10, 11-16;  7:4-6, 7-9
Nocturn II: Sermon 42 of St Leo
Nocturn III and Gospel: Homily 16 on the Gospels of St Gregory
Gospel: St Matthew 4:1-11

Monday in the first week of Lent
Tuesday in the first week of Lent
Ember Wednesday of Lent
Thursday in the first week of Lent
Ember Friday of Lent
Ember Saturday of Lent

Second week of Lent

Sunday II in Lent

Nocturn I: Genesis 27:1-4;13-20; 21-29
Nocturn II: St Augustine:  Against liars
Nocturn III and Gospel: Sermon 51 of St Leo; St Matthew 17:1-9

Monday in the second week of Lent
Tuesday in the second week of Lent
Wednesday in the second week of Lent
Thursday in the Second Week of Lent
Friday in the second week of Lent
Saturday in the Second Week of Lent

Third week of Lent

Third Sunday of Lent

Nocturn I: Genesis 37:2-4, 5-10, 11-20, 21-25
Nocturn II: St Ambrose on Joseph the Patriarch
Nocturn III and Gospel: Homily of St Bede; St Luke 11:14-28

Monday in the third week of Lent
Tuesday in the third week of Lent
Wednesday in the third week of Lent
Thursday in the third week of Lent
Friday in the third week of Lent
Saturday in the third week of Lent

Fourth week of Lent

Fourth Sunday in Lent

Nocturn I: Exodus 3:1-6, 7-8, 9-12, 13-15
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Basil
Third Nocturn and Gospel: Homily of St Augustine; St John 6:1-15

Monday in the fourth week of Lent
Tuesday in the fourth week of Lent
Wednesday in the fourth week of Lent
Thursday in the fourth week of Lent
Friday in the fourth week of Lent
Saturday in the fourth week of Lent

First Week of Passiontide

First Passion Sunday

Nocturn I: Jeremiah 1: 1-6; 7-13; 14-16; 17-19
Nocturn II: Sermon 47 of St Leo
Nocturn III and Gospel: Homily 18 on the Gospels of St Gregory
Gospel: St John 8:46-59

Monday in Passion week
Tuesday in Passion week
Wednesday in Passion week
Thursday in Passion week
Friday in Passion week
Saturday in Passion week

Holy Week

Palm Sunday

Nocturn I: Jeremiah 2:12-15; 16-19; 20-22; 29-32
Nocturn II: Sermon 62 of St Leo
Nocturn III and Gospel: Homily of St Ambrose; St Matthew 21:1-9

Monday of Holy week
Tuesday of Holy Week
Wednesday of Holy Week
Maundy Thursday
Good Friday
Holy Saturday

Matins readings for the season of Septuagesima

The Matins readings in the Benedictine Office for the season of Septuagesima are set out below.

Septuagesima Sunday

Nocturn I: 

Reading 1: Genesis 1:1-8
Reading 2: Genesis 1: 9-13
Reading 3: Genesis 1: 14-19
Reading 4: Genesis 1:20-26

Nocturn II: From St Augustine's Enchiridion (chapters 25-27)
Nocturn III: St Gregory Homily 19 on the Gospels
GospelSt Matthew 20:1-16

Monday after Septuagesima Sunday: Genesis 1:27-31; 2: 1-6, 7-10
Tuesday: Genesis 2:15-18; 19-20; 21-24
Wednesday: Genesis 3:1-7;7-13; 14-20
Thursday: Genesis 4:1-5; 8-12; 13-16
Friday: Genesis 4:17-22; 23-26; 5:1-5
Saturday: Genesis 5:15-21; 22-27; 28-31

Sexagesima Sunday

Nocturn I: 

Reading 1: Genesis 5:32; 6:1-3
Reading 2: Genesis 6: 4-6
Reading 3: Genesis 6: 7-10
Reading 4: Genesis 6:11-15

Nocturn II: From the book of St Ambrose on Noah and the Arc
Nocturn III: Homily 15 on the Gospels of St Gregory
Gospel: St Luke 8:4-15

Monday after Sexagesima Sunday: Genesis 7: 1-4, 7:5& 10-12; 13-14&17
Tuesday: Genesis 8:1-4; 5-9; 10-13
Wednesday: Genesis 8:15-19; 20-22; 9:1-6
Thursday: Genesis 9:12-15; 20-23; 24-29
Friday: Genesis 10:1-6; 11:1-4; 5-8
Saturday: Genesis 11:10-15; 16-23; 24-30

Quinquagesima Sunday

Nocturn I: 

Reading 1: Genesis 12: 1-5
Reading 2: Genesis 12: 6-8
Reading 3: Genesis 12: 9-13
Reading 4: Genesis 12: 14-19

Nocturn II: From the book of St Ambrose on the Patriarch Abraham
Nocturn IIIHomily 2 on the Gospel's of St Gregory
GospelSt Luke 18:31-43

Monday after Quinquagesima Sunday: Genesis 13:1-6; 7-11;12-16
Tuesday: Genesis 14: 8-12; 13-16;17-20

(End of Septuagesimatide)

Matins readings for the weeks after Epiphany

A post with this week's Matins readings will appear shortly, but I thought it might be helpful to let those who are trying to include the Matins readings and/or do some lectio following the pattern of the liturgy know what is coming up.

Accordingly, I'm posting now a partial list of the readings for Matins in the Benedictine Office for the weeks after the Epiphany.  This year (2016) there are only two weeks after Epiphany before we hit Septuagesimatide (when the readings switch to Genesis), so I will fill out the details of the readings for week three and beyond at a later date.

Note that feasts of the saints often have their own readings which displace the ones set out below, and on fourth class Saturdays the three scriptural readings are combined into two, and the third reading is a Patristic text for the Office of Our Lady on Saturday.

First week after Epiphany

First Sunday after Epiphany

Nocturn I: 1 Corinthians I: 1-3; 4-9; 10-11; 12-13
Nocturn IISermon 36 of St Leo
Nocturn III: Homily of St Ambrose on St Luke 2:63-65
GospelSt Luke 2: 42-52

Monday: 1 Corinthians 2: 1-5; 6-9; 10-13
Tuesday: 1 Corinthians 5: 1-5; 6-8; 9-11
Wednesday1 Corinthians 6: 1-6; 7-11; 12-18
Thursday1 Corinthians 7: 1-4; 5-9; 10-14
Friday1 Corinthians 13: 1-3; 4-10; 11-13
Saturday1 Corinthians 16: 1-4; 5-9; 10-14

Second week after Epiphany

Second Sunday

Nocturn I2 Corinthians 1: 1-5, 6-7, 8-11, 12-13
Nocturn II: Sermon of St John Chrysostom (Preface to the letters of St Paul)
Nocturn III: Homily of St Augustine (Tract 9 on St John n2)
Gospel: John 2:1-11

Monday: 2 Corinthians 3: 1-3, 4-8, 9-14
Tuesday2 Corinthians 5: 1-4, 6-10, 11-15
Wednesday:2 Corinthians 7: 1-3, 4-7, 8-10
Thursday2 Corinthians 10: 1-3, 4-9, 10-12
Friday:2 Corinthians 12: 1-4, 5-9, 9-11
Saturday2 Corinthians 13: 1-4, 5-9, 10-13

Third week after Epiphany

Sunday

Nocturn I: Galatians 1: 1-5; 6-8, 9-10, 11-14
Nocturn II: St Augustine on Glaatians
Nocturn III: St Jerome
Gospel: St Matthew 8:1-13

Monday: Galatians 3
Tuesday: Galatians 5
Wednesday: Ephesians 1
Thursday: Ephesians 4
Friday: Ephesians 5
Saturday: Ephesians 5

Fourth week after Epiphany

Sunday
Nocturn I:  Philippians 1
Gospel: St Matthew 8: 23-27

Monday: Philippians 4
Tuesday: Colossians 1
Wednesday: Colossians 3
Thursday: 1 Thessalonians 1
Friday: 1 Thessalonians 4
Saturday: 2 Thessalonians 1

Fifth Week after Epiphany

Sunday

Nocturn I: 1 Timothy 1
Nocturn IIIGospel and Third Nocturn Readings for the Fifth Sunday after the Epiphany
Gospel: St Matthew 13: 24-30

Monday: 1 Timothy 3
Tuesday: 2 Timothy 1
Wednesday: 2 Timothy 3
Thursday: Titus 1
Friday: Titus 3
Saturday: Philemon

Sixth Week after Epiphany

Sunday

Nocturn I: Hebrews 1
Gospel: St Matthew 13: 31-35

Monday: Hebrews 3
Tuesday: Hebrews 4
Wednesday: Hebrews 6
Thursday: Hebrews 7
Friday: Hebrews 11
Saturday: Hebrews 13